Ruh-roh: Are there problems with the Magic Johnson-Guggenheim Partners bid for the Dodgers?

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We’re still in love-fest territory when it comes to the Magic Johnson-Guggenheim partners bid for the Dodgers. Indeed, I just got a press release from the Dodgers’ PR people, announcing the team’s imminent emergence from bankruptcy, and talking about how important that bid is for the process:

“The centerpiece of the Amended Plan is the agreement by Guggenheim Baseball L.P. to pay $2 billion to acquire the equity of the reorganized debtors. This agreement is the culmination of an auction process that was conducted over several months and reflects the highest and best bid generated by that process.  The successful auction process attracted numerous prospective purchasers and numerous proposals, all of which confirmed the substantial value of the Dodgers, the media rights associated with the team, and Dodger Stadium.”

And that’s great.  But as Tom Verducci reports, it’s not all rosy. MLB and some of its owners are a little wary of Magic & Friends:

Major League Baseball officials have expressed concern that Guggenheim Baseball Management, the winning bidders for the Los Angeles Dodgers, has been slow to produce the details of the bid and the structure of its management team, according to several sources familiar with the sale process.

Several individual owners have joined baseball officials in questioning why the Guggenheim group, led by Mark Walter, Stan Kasten and Magic Johnson, has not filed a more detailed Purchase and Sale Agreement more than a week after the group was selected from among three finalists by Frank McCourt, the outgoing owner who is selling the club through U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Now, MLB is not the party approving this sale, the bankruptcy court is. So perhaps this is just grumbling. Still, worth watching before anyone starts printing up Dodgers Magic Johnson jerseys.

Well, I guess you could and just tell everyone that they’re Reed Johnson jerseys, but still.

Royals closer Kelvin Herrera leaves with forearm tightness

Associated Press
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The Royals are a game and a half out of the crazy AL Wild Card race — six games back of the Indians in the division — so they don’t have a huge margin for error. They got some bad news last night, though, that could have a major impact on their playoff hopes: closer Kelvin Herrera experienced tightness in his right forearm in the ninth inning of last night’s win, forcing him out of the game.

Herrera walked the bases loaded, then went to a 2-0 count on the next batter before leaving the game. That last pitch was a fastball that clocked in at 91 m.p.h., which is NOT a typical Kelvin Herrera fastball.  Herrera didn’t talk after the game but his teammate Sal Perez said that Herrera told him  “I’m tight. I don’t feel my forearm.”

Reporters left the clubhouse before an official diagnosis or prognosis could be delivered, so expect an update some time today. If Herrera is out the closer duties could fall to Scott Alexander or Brandon Maurer.

Albert Pujols sets the all-time record for home runs by a foreign-born player

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Albert Pujols had a big night last night, driving in four runs as the Angels beat the Rangers 10-1. Three of those runs came on a three-run homer. That was the 610th home run of Pujols’ career, snapping a tie for eighth on the all-time list with Sammy Sosa. It also made him baseball’s all-time leader for home runs by a player born outside the U.S.

Pujols was aware of the accomplishment, of course, and noted how honored he was after the game:

”It’s pretty special. Obviously, all the great players from the Dominican Republic, Latin America, Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia, they’ve gone through the big leagues and to be able to accomplish something like this is very humbling.”

After Sosa, who is from the Dominican Republic, comes Rafael Palmeiro (569); Manny Ramirez (555); David Ortiz (541); Carlos Delgado (473); Jose Canseco (462); Adrian Beltre and Miguel Cabrera (459).