And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Blue Jays 7, Indians 4: I was invited to go to this game by the Indians, where I would have watched it for free from the Tribe Social Suite. Because of family entanglements I was not able to go, and when I sent the Indians my regrets, I was very sad about it. But 16 innings on a 44 degree day, with beer sales being cut off for more than half the game? Er, kinda glad I didn’t go.

What I missed, of course, was an excellent Justin Masterson getting boned and a bunch of near-fisticuffsmanship, en route to the longest game in Opening Day history. J.P. Arencibia won it with a three-run homer in the 16th. Casey Kotchman and Colby Rasmus each went 0 for 7, which surpasses golden and platinum sombreros by a mile. I think they were unobtanium sombreros. Good show!

Reds 4, Marlins 0: Johnny Cueto tossed seven shutout innings as the Marlins did their part to contribute to the NL East’s collective offensive ineptitude on this Opening Day v3.0.  Indeed, the entire division played yesterday, and they scored a total of four runs.

Phillies 1, Pirates 0: Eight shutout innings, two hits, no walks and five strikeouts for Roy Halladay. Ho-hum. Remember when we were supposed to care about his lack of velocity? Nah, me neither.

Tigers 3, Red Sox 2: Wrote this up yesterday, both here and here.  So for now, I’ll leave you with this depiction of Jose Valverde’s day.

Mets 1, Braves 0: The Red Sox and Braves both lose in dispiriting fashion. It’s like 2011 never ended. Not that the Braves didn’t have a couple of chances, but they’re the Braves and they don’t win games unless three guys hit homers and stuff.  Johan Santana got headlines for being impressive — and given his recent history, he was impressive — but Atlanta squandered a couple of good opportunities here.

Nationals 2, Cubs 1: The Cubs waste a fantastic Ryan Dempster start in which he struck out ten in seven and two-thirds. Stephen Strasburg was nearly as good, but neither figured in the decision. Ian Desmond singled in the winning run in the ninth.  The Cubs, in contrast, ran their way out of a scoring opportunity in the bottom of the ninth when pinch-runner Joe Mather was thrown out trying to score on a grounder to third. Too bad my little league coach wasn’t there to yell at Mather to make sure the ball got through. He was really good at teaching 11 year-olds that.

Dodgers 5, Padres 3: Clayton Kershaw started this game despite suffering from a nasty flu that had him vomiting and — according to Vin Scully — having diarrhea. Which I’m going to go out on a limb and guess was the first and last time in his 60+ year career that Scully said the word diarrhea during a broadcast.  Kershaw looked like he was going to be able to hold up for a while — he threw three shutout innings and he even hit a double — but ran out of mojo. Five Dodgers relievers held the Padres off, while Edinson Volquez walked in two runs with the bases loaded. Matt Kemp hit a homer and was caught stealing, so his quest to become the first member of the 50/50 club was partially successful.

Only one more Opening Day, folks!

Video: Jaime Garcia hits a 399-foot grand slam

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Jaime Garcia has been at the center of trade talks for several days now, but on Friday night, he commanded center stage for an entirely different reason. The Braves’ southpaw went head-to-head with Dodgers’ lefty Alex Wood and mashed his first career grand slam: a two-out, 399-foot blast that cleared the wall in right field and put the Braves up 9-0 in the fifth inning.

The bases-loaded knock was the third career home run for Garcia, whose contributions at the plate have been few and far between over his nine-year track in the major leagues. Not only did the homer mark an impressive career first for the 30-year-old, but it was just the second pitcher grand slam in Braves’ history and the first since 1966.

Garcia looked almost as impressive on the mound during Friday’s series opener, issuing one run, four hits and three strikeouts through his first six innings. The Braves currently lead the Dodgers 12-1 in the top of the seventh inning.

As for whether the slam will affect negotiations between the Braves and Twins? MLB.com’s Mike Petriello put it best:

Ryon Healy exits game after taking a ground ball to the face

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Athletics’ first baseman Ryon Healy had a scary moment during Friday’s loss to the Mets. Lucas Duda smacked a single to the first base side, where the ball took a high hop and caught Healy in the left temple. He crumpled to the ground after getting struck by the one-hopper, but was eventually able to stand and walk off the field with assistance from a trainer.

Prior to the injury, Healy went 2-for-3 at the plate with an RBI single in the first inning. He was replaced by Yonder Alonso, who finished off the rest of the night’s 7-5 loss with a walk in two plate appearances.

Following the game, manager Bob Melvin told reporters that Healy did not appear to have sustained a concussion as a result of the hit. Healy said he thinks he’ll be good to go for Saturday’s game, though a final decision likely won’t be made until tomorrow.