And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Blue Jays 7, Indians 4: I was invited to go to this game by the Indians, where I would have watched it for free from the Tribe Social Suite. Because of family entanglements I was not able to go, and when I sent the Indians my regrets, I was very sad about it. But 16 innings on a 44 degree day, with beer sales being cut off for more than half the game? Er, kinda glad I didn’t go.

What I missed, of course, was an excellent Justin Masterson getting boned and a bunch of near-fisticuffsmanship, en route to the longest game in Opening Day history. J.P. Arencibia won it with a three-run homer in the 16th. Casey Kotchman and Colby Rasmus each went 0 for 7, which surpasses golden and platinum sombreros by a mile. I think they were unobtanium sombreros. Good show!

Reds 4, Marlins 0: Johnny Cueto tossed seven shutout innings as the Marlins did their part to contribute to the NL East’s collective offensive ineptitude on this Opening Day v3.0.  Indeed, the entire division played yesterday, and they scored a total of four runs.

Phillies 1, Pirates 0: Eight shutout innings, two hits, no walks and five strikeouts for Roy Halladay. Ho-hum. Remember when we were supposed to care about his lack of velocity? Nah, me neither.

Tigers 3, Red Sox 2: Wrote this up yesterday, both here and here.  So for now, I’ll leave you with this depiction of Jose Valverde’s day.

Mets 1, Braves 0: The Red Sox and Braves both lose in dispiriting fashion. It’s like 2011 never ended. Not that the Braves didn’t have a couple of chances, but they’re the Braves and they don’t win games unless three guys hit homers and stuff.  Johan Santana got headlines for being impressive — and given his recent history, he was impressive — but Atlanta squandered a couple of good opportunities here.

Nationals 2, Cubs 1: The Cubs waste a fantastic Ryan Dempster start in which he struck out ten in seven and two-thirds. Stephen Strasburg was nearly as good, but neither figured in the decision. Ian Desmond singled in the winning run in the ninth.  The Cubs, in contrast, ran their way out of a scoring opportunity in the bottom of the ninth when pinch-runner Joe Mather was thrown out trying to score on a grounder to third. Too bad my little league coach wasn’t there to yell at Mather to make sure the ball got through. He was really good at teaching 11 year-olds that.

Dodgers 5, Padres 3: Clayton Kershaw started this game despite suffering from a nasty flu that had him vomiting and — according to Vin Scully — having diarrhea. Which I’m going to go out on a limb and guess was the first and last time in his 60+ year career that Scully said the word diarrhea during a broadcast.  Kershaw looked like he was going to be able to hold up for a while — he threw three shutout innings and he even hit a double — but ran out of mojo. Five Dodgers relievers held the Padres off, while Edinson Volquez walked in two runs with the bases loaded. Matt Kemp hit a homer and was caught stealing, so his quest to become the first member of the 50/50 club was partially successful.

Only one more Opening Day, folks!

Marco Estrada signs a one-year, $13 million deal for 2018

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Marco Estrada and the Blue Jays have agreed to a one-year, $13 million extension with the Blue Jays, reports Jon Morosi of MLB.com. Last night Morosi reported that the sides were near a deal.

This extension is, functionally, like adding a year on to his old deal, which paid him $26 million for the 2016-17 seasons. As Bill noted last night. while the 34-year-old right-hander has a subpar 4.84 ERA on the season, he has a solid 170/67 K/BB ratio in 176.2 innings this year and has improved in the second half.

The Red Sox will air anti-racism PSA before games beginning next week

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Adrian Walker of the Boston Globe reports that the Boston Red Sox will air an anti-racism public service announcement at Fenway Park before their game on September 28. This is part of a large campaign backed by the Sox, the Boston Bruins, Boston Celtics, New England Patriots and New England Revolution “featuring athletes calling on fans to take a stand against racism and hate speech at sports venues.”

This comes in the wake of a group of protesters hanging an anti-racism banner in Fenway Park last week which, in turn came a few months after Adam Jones, like many visiting players of color before him, claimed that racial epithets were hurled at him by fans in the Fenway bleachers.

Red Sox CEO Sam Kennedy tells the globe that the Jones incident is what inspired the PSA campaign:

“When the incidents in May occurred, one of the first things we recognized was sports teams are high-profile, and we have the opportunity to help lead a high-level discussion around this,” he said. “We wanted to take the lead in taking a stand against racism.”