And now, the top 20 jerseys sold

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MLB and the MLBPA just released the list of the top 20 jerseys sold in the past year. The list contains the usual gang you’d expect. Except I was somewhat surprised at David Freese at number 20, but I guess that World Series homer was quite the moment for Cards fans. Anyway:

1.    Derek Jeter, New York Yankees
2.    Cliff Lee, Philadelphia Phillies
3.    Albert Pujols, LA Angels of Anaheim
4.    Josh Hamilton, Texas Rangers
5.    Roy Halladay, Philadelphia Phillies
6.    Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants
7.    Dustin Pedroia, Boston Red Sox
8.    Ryan Braun, Milwaukee Brewers
9.    Hunter Pence, Philadelphia Phillies
10.  Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants
11.  Chase Utley, Philadelphia Phillies
12.  Joe Mauer, Minnesota Twins
13.  Justin Verlander, Detroit Tigers
14.  Adrian Gonzalez, Boston Red Sox
15.  Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees
16.  Ian Kinsler, Texas Rangers
17.  Robinson Cano, New York Yankees
18.  Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees
19.  Carl Crawford, Boston Red Sox
20.  David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals

Cano, Crawford, Freese, Gonzalez, Pence, Rivera and Verlander are new to the top 20. Kind of shocked about Rivera, but there you go.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.