Johan Santana throws bullpen session, expected to be named Mets’ Opening Day starter

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Johan Santana is very close to starting his first major league game since September 2, 2010.

According to Adam Rubin of ESPNNewYork.com, Santana made it through a bullpen session this afternoon without any issues and is expected to be named as the Mets’ Opening Day starter tomorrow unless he reports any discomfort in his surgically-repaired shoulder.

Santana labored through a spring-high 88 pitches during his last start Monday against the Cardinals, but Mets pitching coach Dan Warthen was impressed by how he looked on the mound this afternoon.

“He was free and easy,” pitching coach Dan Warthen said about Saturday’s bullpen session, which included 39 warm-up pitches, then another 32 at game intensity. “The body didn’t ache. It hasn’t been the arm at any time. It’s been more the wear and tear on the body, getting it back in shape, and then being able to take the volume of pitches. Today he could have pitched very easily [in a game]. The body recovered really well yesterday.

Mets manager Terry Collins admitted that it would mean a lot to have Santana start Thursday’s season opener against the Braves, but he isn’t willing to push him if he needs a couple extra days to get ready.

Santana posted a 3.44 ERA and 13/7 K/BB ratio over 18 1/3 innings during Grapefruit League play. The Mets figure to have him on a pretty short leash initially, likely pulling him after 90 pitches or six innings.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.