Curt Schilling says Red Sox players hate Bobby Valentine

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You’re not gonna believe this, but Curt Schilling has some hard, controversial truths about the Boston Red Sox which were revealed to him, Curt Schilling, because he is, in fact, Curt Schilling:

Speaking on WEEI earlier this week, he said that several players have complained to him about Valentine’s behavior:

“I thought that the manager that managed the Mets that I was not a big fan of was now going to be a different manager, and I don’t think there’s anything different at all,” Schilling said. “And I don’t think that that is going to be conducive to doing well here. There’s a lot of things I think that are happening not just from his perspective, but when you talk to these guys—and I’m still talking to some of these guys—I don’t think this is going well. And I think it’s going bad quicker than I expected it to.”…He also said that the players don’t like how much attention Valentine has brought to the clubhouse.

And then, in a moment of complete lack of self-awareness, Schilling said this:

“The point I made the other night was that he’s doing a lot of things right now that are forcing his players to extend their media involvement to answer questions about him and the situation when it’s already a challenge enough to do it, to play in this market and to win,” he said.

Because Schilling never, ever did that. Oy.

Anyway, Curt Schilling has been out of baseball since 2007. I wonder how much of his insight here is really based on him talking to a lot of Red Sox players and how much of it is based on him talking to, say, one or two of them and then filling in the rest with his own opinion. Which, as far as the Red Sox clubhouse is concerned, doesn’t matter one iota.

Even if Schilling is right, though, every team is going to have guys who hate the manager. Indeed, as Casey Stengel once said: “the secret of managing is to keep the guys who hate you away from the guys who are undecided.”  So great, Schilling found the guys that hate Valentine. News flash.

(thanks to Dan Turkenkopf for reminding me where that quote came from).

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.