Ruben Amaro on Chase Utley’s health: “I’m not trying to deceive anybody”

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There has been considerable uncertainty swirling around Chase Utley’s health this spring, fueled in no small part by Utley and the team being seemingly unwilling, until Sunday at least, to provide updates as to his status.  This led to Ruben Amaro assembling reporters in Clearwater yesterday to tell them, hey, I wouldn’t lie to you:

“We don’t have anything to gain from hiding information from you guys. That’s not our modus operandi. There are times we just don’t know. I’m not trying to deceive anybody. Why would I lie to the public? How is that going to make the organization’s relationship with the public better? What benefit would I have to tell you Chase is fine when I know that he’s not? What good does that do for us? We pride ourselves on having a pretty good relationship with our fans. There’s no real benefit for us to lie to them.”

All of which is true. And as Amaro implied later, this was less about the team being unwilling to talk about it than it was Utley being unwilling. As Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com reports, it was Utley who did not want the team to reveal the name of the specialist he went to see over the weekend, and it appears to be his desire for privacy about all of this that has led to the Phillies, if not deceiving people, at least being cagey about it all.

This is less about injuries and Utley, though, and more about expectations. Whether it’s this or trade talks or something else, fans and the media have come to expect a certain kind of discourse when it comes to these things. It may be inane discourse, but it’s noticed in the absence in ways that it would never be noticed if Amaro or Utley had just mouthed platitudes about it all last week.

Just the kind of thing that makes you realize the weirdness of our relationship with these teams and these players. We think we know them so well. We expect to know even more than than we already do. But in reality, we are kind of distant. I think therein lies both the appeal of sports-as-storyline and the problem with it.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.