Pittsburgh Pirates v Philadelphia Phillies

Ruben Amaro on Chase Utley’s health: “I’m not trying to deceive anybody”


There has been considerable uncertainty swirling around Chase Utley’s health this spring, fueled in no small part by Utley and the team being seemingly unwilling, until Sunday at least, to provide updates as to his status.  This led to Ruben Amaro assembling reporters in Clearwater yesterday to tell them, hey, I wouldn’t lie to you:

“We don’t have anything to gain from hiding information from you guys. That’s not our modus operandi. There are times we just don’t know. I’m not trying to deceive anybody. Why would I lie to the public? How is that going to make the organization’s relationship with the public better? What benefit would I have to tell you Chase is fine when I know that he’s not? What good does that do for us? We pride ourselves on having a pretty good relationship with our fans. There’s no real benefit for us to lie to them.”

All of which is true. And as Amaro implied later, this was less about the team being unwilling to talk about it than it was Utley being unwilling. As Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com reports, it was Utley who did not want the team to reveal the name of the specialist he went to see over the weekend, and it appears to be his desire for privacy about all of this that has led to the Phillies, if not deceiving people, at least being cagey about it all.

This is less about injuries and Utley, though, and more about expectations. Whether it’s this or trade talks or something else, fans and the media have come to expect a certain kind of discourse when it comes to these things. It may be inane discourse, but it’s noticed in the absence in ways that it would never be noticed if Amaro or Utley had just mouthed platitudes about it all last week.

Just the kind of thing that makes you realize the weirdness of our relationship with these teams and these players. We think we know them so well. We expect to know even more than than we already do. But in reality, we are kind of distant. I think therein lies both the appeal of sports-as-storyline and the problem with it.

Astros leave Chad Qualls off playoff roster, add Preston Tucker

Chad Qualls Getty
Leave a comment

Houston made one unexpected change to the roster for the ALDS, leaving off veteran reliever Chad Qualls.

Qualls warmed up but never appeared in the Wild Card game win over the Yankees and during the regular season the 36-year-old right-hander logged 49 innings with a 4.38 ERA and 46/9 K/BB ratio. Qualls was on the Astros’ last playoff team in 2005.

Utility man Jonathan Villar has been bumped off the roster in favor of outfielder Preston Tucker, as the Astros opted for a good left-handed bat off the bench versus the Royals rather than Villar’s speed.

Royals leave Jonny Gomes off playoff roster

Atlanta Braves outfielder Jonny Gomes, who was pitching in relief, tips his cap as New York Yankees' Chris Young rounds the bases after a solo home run in the ninth inning of a baseball game Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Leave a comment

It’s been a tough season for the mythology of Jonny Gomes‘ veteran clubhouse savior reputation.

First he signed with the rebuilding Braves and performed poorly while Atlanta fell apart after a surprisingly decent start. Then he was traded to the Royals, for whom he played just 12 games and hit .167. And now Kansas City has left Gomes off the ALDS roster.

It makes sense, though. Gomes’ only real use to the Royals would be as a pinch-hitter versus left-handed pitching, but manager Ned Yost rarely pinch-hits and will no doubt be more willing to use 25th man Terrance Gore as a pinch-runner in the late innings.

Beyond that, not many surprises on the Royals’ roster for their series against the Astros. They went with 11 pitchers, which means both Chris Young and Kris Medlen are on the roster. Jeremy Guthrie is not.