Orel Hershiser wants to make Dodger Stadium look kinda silly

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Orel Hershiser isn’t involved in the bidding for the Dodgers, but he is campaigning for Dodger Stadium. As in, he wants to be sure it lasts for many more years, and to that end has commissioned an architectural rendering of what a renovated Dodger Stadium might look like:

source:

(rendering by Brian Kite / Lynx Architecture)

Thoughts:

  • The deck in right field — along with the additional seats in left field where currently a bullpen sits — appears to increase the seating. Dodger Stadium currently holds 56,000 people. The highest average attendance the Dodgers have ever had in a season was in 2007 when they averaged 47,614 a game. Does the place really need new seats?
  • The deck in right field is also rather horrifying. The Ballpark in Arlington called and said that if this was designed by anyone other than old Tiger Stadium, they’re stealing its bit.  And that aside, the current zig-zaggy roof over the outfield seats is really cool, but this plan obliterates it. Same goes for the hexagonal scoreboard. Anyone interested in preserving Dodger Stadium has to preserve the cool stuff, man.
  • Since when do the Dodgers feature a script-D logo like the one on that center field scoreboard?
  • Since when do the Dodgers want to install a Yankee Stadium (or heck, Ballpark in Arlington)-style frieze?  The Dodgers’ history is as rich as any team’s in the game. They don’t need to start appropriating stuff from other teams.

Look, maybe Dodger Stadium needs some work and modernization. But it doesn’t need a design overhaul.  It was and still remains a fabulously designed park. Bringing it into the 21st century, cleaning it up and adding some conveniences should not require turning it into a frankenpark like this design.

Your heart is in the right place, Mr. Hershiser. But go back to the drawing board.

Report: Yankees to promote Gleyber Torres

Yankees Torres Baseball
AP Images
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Yankees top prospect Gleyber Torres will be promoted to the majors this weekend, per a report from Jack Curry of the YES Network. Torres was expected to make his debut earlier in the season, but his starting date was pushed back after he suffered a bout of back tightness last Monday. Now, however, it looks like he’s finally healthy enough to make an impact on a team that’s in sore need of an offensive boost. As of Saturday evening, the team has yet to officially confirm the move.

The 21-year-old infielder has made quite the impression in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre this spring, slashing .370/.415/.543 with five extra-base hits and 11 RBI in his first 53 plate appearances. Prior to the start of the 2018 season, he was ranked first overall in the Yankees’ system and fifth among the league’s best prospects (via MLB Pipeline). His numbers at the plate have been made all the more impressive by the fact that he’s only 10 months removed from Tommy John surgery on his non-throwing arm; neither the injury nor the lengthy recovery process seems to have had any detrimental effect on his game play this year.

While Torres appears most comfortable as a shortstop, he’s not expected to supplant Didi Gregorius in a starting role. Instead, it’s more likely that he’ll sub in at second and third base among the likes of Miguel Andujar, Neil Walker and Ronald Torreyes.