George Brett: if steroid users get elected to the Hall of Fame, current inductees will boycott


George Brett was interviewed by Bob McManaman of the Arizona Republic and the topic of PED users and the Hall of Fame came up. Brett says that if he were a voter, he would not put guys like Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens on his ballot.  Which, fine, there are a lot of people who think that way.  But Brett went further:

“I wasn’t a home-run hitter,” Brett said, “but I know from talking to guys in the 500-home run club, guys like Schmitty (Mike Schmidt) and some other guys like that, if those guys make it in then they’ll never go back.”


“Meaning those guys will never go back and attend (the Hall of Fame inductions) if the cheaters get elected.”

Really? Mike Schmidt would boytcott? The same Mike Schmidt who said that if A-Rod — who Brett specifically criticized by name — were to be elected, he’d “welcome him”?  The same Schmidt who is on record saying that if PEDs were prevalent during his time he probably would have used them too? He’d boycott?  Color me skeptical.

Also color me skeptical about this statement from Brett:

Brett doesn’t believe Alex Rodriguez, who was caught using steroids, should get into the Hall of Fame, either. Maybe if A-Rod would have come clean in the beginning, or tried to make amends like pitcher Andy Pettitte and slugger Jason Giambi did, Brett could see it.

Someone please explain to me how Pettitte or Giambi came clean in ways that Alex Rodriguez didn’t. Because my recollection of it all was that all three of them admitted to doing something only after they were caught. The biggest difference from what I can tell is that A-Rod was not very well-liked beforehand while Pettitte and Giambi were.

Anyway, the same old story here: subjective baloney about PEDs with some people being treated very differently for reasons that make little sense.

Major League Baseball reveals their special event uniforms for 2018


Major League Baseball will once again celebrate various holidays and special occasions with special uniforms this season. The special caps and unis for Memorial Day and the Fourth of July are largely in keeping with past practice. There’s a fairly notable change for Mother’s and Father’s Day, however, as what were once pink and blue accents are now full-blown pink and blue caps.

On Jackie Robinson Day — April 15 — players will, as always, be wearing number 42. New this year will be patches on the jerseys and caps. Like so:

Here is what the Mother’s Day caps will look like:

And for Dad:

Here’s Memorial Day. Like last year, the stars represent the five branches of the U.S. military. There will be camo jerseys, like you’ve seen before, to match:


The Blue Jays’ caps will feature four clusters for the four branches of the Canadian military:

Here’s the Fourth of July which will, again, be paired with stars and stripes-themed jerseys:

And check out the inside of the bill:


Fun fact: the Fourth of July is the day the signing of the Declaration of Independence was signed. It has little if anything to do with the Constitution, from which “We The People” is taken, which was ratified on June 21, 1788. But don’t stop MLB, they’re on a roll.

The Blue Jays cap, again, differs, with the logo being a gold maple leaf and the inside of the bill simply saying “Canada”:

As always, proceeds from the sale of this merch will go to the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Susan G. Komen, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer.

As as also long been the case, Major League Baseball will do nothing for Labor Day, much to my annual annoyance.