Astros minor leaguer Angel Heredia suspended for PEDs

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I’ve come to look forward to the once or twice weekly minor league drug suspensions. I don’t know who any of these dudes are, but I feel like I learn a little bit about them anyway. Like Astros minor leaguer Angel Heredia:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball announced today that Houston Astros Minor League right-handed pitcher Angel Heredia has received a 50-game suspension after testing positive for metabolites of Stanozolol and Boldenone, performance-enhancing substances, in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.

Angel Heredia: These metabolites all go to two. Look, right across the board, two, two, two and…
Bud Selig: Oh, I see. And most metabolites go up to just one?
Heredia: Exactly.
Selig: Does that mean it’s stronger? Is it any stronger?
Heredia: Well, it’s one stronger, isn’t it? It’s not one. You see, most blokes, you know, will be injecting at one. You’re on one here, all the way up, all the way up, all the way up, you’re on one on your syringe. Where can you go from there? Where?
Selig: I don’t know.
Heredia: Nowhere. Exactly. What we do is, if we need that extra push over the cliff, you know what we do?
Selig: Put it up to two.
Heredia: Two. Exactly. One stronger.
Selig: Why don’t you just make one stronger and make one be the top metabolite and make that a little stronger?
Heredia: [pause] These go to two.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.