Shockingly, the Nationals’ new eight-pound “StrasBurger” is really, really bad for you


I posted yesterday about the new eight-pound “StrasBurger” the Nationals will be selling at their concession stands this season and Adam Vingan of took a closer look at the monstrous hamburger.

Turns out, not so healthy:

Colleen Gerg, a registered dietitian from Chevy Chase, Md., did a general breakdown of the “nutritional value” — or more appropriately, the lack thereof — of the StrasBurger. According to Gerg, the StrasBurger is somewhere between 8,000-10,000 calories, packs 600-700 grams of fat, 200-300 grams of saturated fat and 2,500-3,000 milligrams of sodium. It seems that the Nationals are advertising the burger as something to be shared, but even then, it still packs a wallop.

“If the burger is split four ways, each person’s portion would therefore be at least 2,000 calories, 150 grams of fat, 50 grams saturated fat and 625 mg of sodium,” Gerg said in an email Monday. “All of these are higher than what many, if not most, people need in an entire DAY, except for sodium.”

To put that in some context, while losing 150 pounds in one year I never once ate more than 2,000 calories in a day and there were definitely plenty of weeks in which I consumed fewer than 10,000 total calories.

StrasBurger might be worse for you than Tommy John surgery.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.