Tommy Hanson has fun in abbreviated spring debut


Pitching with a new delivery and a damaged shoulder that didn’t require surgery, Tommy Hanson gave up three runs — two earned — in one-plus innings Sunday against the Blue Jays in his spring debut.

Hanson turned in a one-two-three first, but he didn’t retire any of the four hitters he faced in the second before a rain delay halted his outing. Some of that was the defense’s fault, as Freddie Freeman committed an error behind him. Some of it was his fault, like when he gave up a two-run homer to one of baseball’s worst hitters in Jeff Mathis.

“The first inning was a lot more fun than the second,” Hanson told “I was getting balls that were soaked and wet and the mound was drenched. But it was still fun. When I was out there, I was just laughing about it because I was glad to be back out there on the mound. It was fun to compete again. It was one of those conditions where I didn’t really care what happened because it didn’t matter. It was almost like I was a little kid playing in the rain again.”

Hanson missed the final two months of last season and was diagnosed with a minor tear in his rotator cuff. The new delivery he’s working with this spring was designed to make him quicker to the plate, but it’s also supposed to be easier on his shoulder.

“I felt great,” Hanson said. “Obviously, my command was a little bit off, but my body felt really good. I made some good pitches at times.”

Hanson is expected to open the season as the Braves’ No. 2 starter.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.