Buster Posey catches two innings in first game since collision last May

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We’ve provided pretty consistent updates on Buster Posey since his season ended last May with a broken leg and torn ankle ligaments following a collision with Marlins’ outfielder Scott Cousins. But after months of talking about the latest step in his rehab process, we finally have some baseball results to pass along.

Posey caught two innings yesterday in his Cactus League debut against the Reds. Though his appearance was brief, he managed to block some balls in the dirt and threw down to second base on a successful stolen base attempt by Miguel Cairo. He had the unenviable task of facing hard-throwing left-hander Aroldis Chapman in his only at-bat, running the count to 2-2 before flying out to right field.

The goal is being ready for Opening Day, but Posey told John Schlegel of MLB.com that he was pretty satisfied with his debut.

“I haven’t played since the end of last May, so I definitely had some nerves — good nerves, though,” Posey said.

“This is part of the process. We’ll see how my ankle responds tomorrow. From all indications now, I think it’ll be good. We’ve stuck to the plan the whole way.”

Giants manager Bruce Bochy said Posey’s next step will be catching four innings, likely on Sunday. The hope is to stretch him out to seven or eight innings by the middle of the exhibition schedule and having him catch a full nine-inning game before the team breaks camp.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.