Three-time All-Star Carlos Guillen announces retirement

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Carlos Guillen, who signed a minor-league contract with the Mariners on February 1, announced his retirement today.

Guillen had a remarkable career, transitioning from light-hitting shortstop to an impact bat who played all over the diamond, but injuries limited him to just 81, 68, and 28 mostly ineffective games during the past three seasons.

He calls it quits at age 36 after playing 14 seasons in the majors, including two huge years for the Tigers in 2004 (.318 with 20 homers and a .921 OPS) and 2006 (.320 with 19 homers and a .920 OPS).

Overall the switch-hitting Guillen batted .285 with a .355 on-base percentage and .443 slugging percentage in 1,305 games for the Mariners and Tigers. Among all active hitters with at least 5,000 career plate appearances he ranks 32nd in adjusted OPS+ at 111, alongside Alfonso Soriano (112), Andruw Jones (111), and Adrian Beltre (110).

He made three All-Star teams and earned $70 million. Not a bad career for a guy who was second-best prospect (behind Freddy Garcia) traded from the Astros to the Mariners for Randy Johnson in 1998.

UPDATE: Guillen talked about his decision with Greg Johns of MLB.com:

It’s a tough decision. I tried to come back, but I couldn’t. I’ve been through a lot of injuries. You have to keep your head up and be in the right position to keep going. But at this time, your body tells you, you know? It’s hard because you only make this decision one time in your career and in your life.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.