Olney: Cole Hamels unlikely to give the Phillies a discount

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ESPN’s Buster Olney chimes in on a popular topic around Philadelphia these days:

Some of you suggesting Hamels will take a hometown discount. IMO, little chance that will happen. Santana money (about $120m) or he’s gone.

Which sounds about right, except for the fact that Santana money isn’t about $120 million. Six pitchers in big-league history have signed $100 million contracts:

CC Sabathia – seven years, $161 million
Johan Santana – six years, $137.5 million
Barry Zito – seven years, $126 million
Mike Hampton – eight years, $121 million
Cliff Lee – five years, $120 million
Kevin Brown – seven years, $105 million

(Technically, you could add Sabathia to the list a second time, if you want to include his new extension with the Yankees that replaced the old deal.)

Hamels, a free agent-to-be, is poised to become the seventh, assuming that he stays healthy for another year. He’ll be 29 next winter and he’s one of the game’s top 10 pitchers, so it’s entirely possible he’ll be in line for right around $140 million over seven years. Olney sees the Dodgers as strong suitors, and just because the Yankees and Red Sox are thinking about luxury-tax ramifications doesn’t mean they can be counted out. Elite pitching talents aren’t available every winter.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.