Chris Carter signs with the Seibu Lions of Japan’s Pacific League

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Adam Rubin of ESPN New York notes that former major league outfielder Chris Carter is now playing with the Seibu Lions of Japan’s Pacific League.

Carter is best known for being traded from the Red Sox to the Mets as the player to be named later in the Billy Wagner deal in August of 2009. And, well, being confused with the other Chris Carter. This Chris Carter owns a .263/.316/.374 batting line with four homers over 206 plate appearances in the majors between Boston and New York.

Carter, 29, hasn’t played in the majors since batting .263/.317/.389 with four home runs, 24 RBI and a .706 OPS over 180 plate appearances with the Mets in 2010. “The Animal” batted .286/.331/.488 with 14 home runs, 63 RBI and an .819 OPS over 77 games at the Triple-A level last season between the Rays and Braves.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.