Brace yourselves for another drug suspension appeal!

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I’m guessing this one won’t be as contentious as the Braun one, but still.

Remember yesterday how minor leaguer James Dowdy was suspended for 50 games for refusing a drug test?  Well, he tells Deadspin that he didn’t refuse anything.  Dowdy says that the urine collector — a job we didn’t think much about until earlier this week — went to the wrong house:

Today Dowdy reached out to us to dispute MLB’s version of events. He says he never refused to take a drug test, and that baseball’s testers never got in touch with him … “They never came to the address that I listed for my offseason living,” Dowdy says. “They went to my mom’s house. I’m 28 years old. I don’t live with my mom! They messed this up in so many ways.”

Now would be a good time for all of you people who say that the procedures don’t matter to weigh in. I mean, a drug tester was there! And Dowdy did not provide a sample!  This suspension must stand, right?

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”