Boston Red Sox manager Valentine watches pitchers work out at the Red Sox new Major League Baseball spring training facility in Fort Myers

Bobby Valentine is already trolling Yankees fans


If Bobby Valentine’s goal is to play the role of villain in the eyes of Yankees’ fans, he’s already off to a pretty good start.

According to the Associated Press, earlier today the Red Sox were practicing relay throws and Valentine was asked about Derek Jeter’s famous “flip” to home plate in Game 3 of the 2001 ALDS against the A’s. His answer?

“We’ll never practice that,” Valentine said. “And I think (Jeter) was out of position and I think the ball gets (Giambi) out if he doesn’t touch it, personally.”

“That was amazing that he was there,” Valentine said. “Then it was more amazing to say they practiced it. I don’t believe it.”

Of course, unless Valentine is some sort of omnipotent being, he has no way of knowing how the second hop would have affected the path of the ball to home plate. Jeter’s flip at least allowed the ball to get to Jorge Posada on the fly. And as Rob Neyer recalled late this afternoon, former Yankees’ manager Buck Showalter claims that Jeter did indeed practice the flip play.

But Valentine wasn’t done ribbing the Yankees. When asked to comment on what Jason Varitek meant to the Red Sox organization, he brought up the infamous benches-clearing incident between the longtime catcher and Alex Rodriguez on July 24, 2004.

“He is a man’s man,” Valentine said of Varitek. “He was a big hitter when needed. He was a leader of the pitching staff. He was able to beat up Alex. All that stuff is good stuff. He was exactly what he was supposed to be.”

If you’ll recall, Rodriguez was plunked by Bronson Arroyo and jawed with the pitcher on the way to first base. Varitek then jumped in between them and shoved his catcher’s mitt in Rodriguez’s face. A-Rod then attempted to put Varitek in a headlock, but the pair were eventually separated as part of a scrum after benches cleared. Whether Varitek actually “beat up” Rodriguez is up for debate, but I guess it works for a quick sound bite. And it’s certainly a moment which epitomized the intensity of the intense rivalry between the clubs at that particular time.

And so, I’ll give Valentine a four out of 10 for historical accuracy. But his trolling ability is pretty spot on.

Dexter Fowler becomes first black player to play for the Cubs in the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Tim Bradbury/Getty Images)
Tim Bradbury/Getty Images

The last time the Cubs were in the World Series was 1945, two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball. As such, until Tuesday night, the Cubs never had a black player play for them in the World Series.

Dexter Fowler changed that, leading off the ballgame at Progressive Field against the Indians. Fowler was made aware of this fact three days ago by Rany Jazayerli of The Ringer:

Fowler, in that at-bat, went ahead in the count 2-1 but ended up striking out looking on a Corey Kluber sinker.

Drew Pomeranz does not need arm surgery

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox throws a pitch in the fifth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Red Sox lefty Drew Pomeranz was of limited utility during the postseason as he began experiencing soreness in his left forearm near the end of the 2016 season. There was some thought that he might need offseason surgery but Pomeranz was examined by doctors who determined that he does not need any surgery, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports. President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said:

He has seen the doctor, the doctor looked at him. I can’t really disclose totally everything that was done, but the doctor said no surgical procedure and the doctor feels he will be ready for next spring training for us.

Pomeranz, 27, finished the 2016 regular season with an aggregate 3.32 ERA and a 186/65 K/BB ratio in 170 2/3 innings between the Padres and Red Sox. He operated out of the bullpen during the playoffs, allowing two runs on four hits and two walks with seven strikeouts over 3 2/3 innings.

The Red Sox acquired Pomeranz in a trade with the Padres in July. It was a trade that earned Padres GM A.J. Preller a 30-day suspension from Major League Baseball, as he reportedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners.