Someone is suing the Marlins, claiming they bought the team for $10 million at an auction

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This is fun. In 2008, Marlins’ president David Samson apparently served as auctioneer at what I can only guess was a charity auction at a Florida Marlins awards banquet at a country club.

At the outset of the auction, he said, in what I can only guess was a joking manner, that the Marlins were the first item up for bid, minimum bid, $10 million.

Then, from the crowd, someone, in what one would reasonably assume was a joking manner, bid $10 million.  I’m sure there were chuckles all around, and then the actual auction began.

Except the guy who bid $10 million now claims that he was serious and is suing the Marlins, claiming that they breached a contract by not selling the team to him for $10 million.  Courtesy of Sport in Law, here’s the lawsuit.

This is why we can’t have nice things, people.

The suit was filed by an actual law firm too, not some weirdo acting on his own twisted behalf.  Here’s hoping that the judge who is assigned to the case is especially cranky the day he or she reads this thing and kicks all kinds of lawyer and plaintiff butt as he or she drums this frivolous complaint out of court.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.