Miami taxpayers one step closer to paying another $1.2 million per year to benefit the Marlins


Last fall we learned that the city of Miami faces an unexpected $1.2 million property tax bill as a result of its largess to Jeff Loria and the Miami Marlins. Seems the city thought that a stadium parking garage it built and paid for is not going to be exempt from property taxes because, despite the fact that it is a publicly-owned facility, it is used for the benefit of a private business (i.e. the Marlins). Which leases it from the city. And profits from it, of course.

State lawmakers have been trying to pass a bill that would save Miami from having to pay that property tax — sorry schools, roads and infrastructure! — but they’ve hit a roadblock: the bill appears as though it would be unconstitutional.

How will this ever be resolved?

  • (a) Someone in Tallahassee will figure out how to ram the law though one way or another, thereby shorting the county’s coffers of tax revenue that it has every right to given that the parking garage is a profit center for both the city and the Marlins;
  • (b) No law will be passed and Miami taxpayers will have to pony up an extra $1.2 million on top of what they’re already paying to enrich Jeff Loria; or
  • (c) Loria and the Marlins will do the right thing and compensate the city for the property taxes, what with the garage being a publicly-funded cash cow for the team and $1.2 million being mere rounding error for them, thanks in part to the giant windfall they have already received?

If your guess is (c), you have no paid much attention to how the business of publicly funded stadiums has gone on in this country over the past 20 years or so.

Justin Turner suffers broken wrist after being hit by a pitch

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Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner left Monday’s Cactus League game against the Athletics after he was hit by a pitch. He went for X-rays, revealing that he suffered a broken wrist, Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports. Shaikin adds that Turner is unlikely to return before May, noting that Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman missed six weeks with a similar injury last year and Astros outfielder George Springer missed nine weeks in 2015.

Needless to say, this is a huge loss for the Dodgers. Last year, Turner hit .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI in 543 plate appearances, helping the Dodgers reach the World Series. He made the All-Star team for the first time in his career and finished eighth in NL MVP balloting.

Thankfully, the Dodgers have some versatile players on the roster. Logan Forsythe could move from second base to third, giving Chase Utley more playing time at second. Enrique Hernandez could man the hot corner as well. Chris Taylor has played some third base, or he could shift to second base in Forsythe’s stead. The club should shed some light on how it plans to move forward following Turner’s injury.