Tim Hudson expects to miss first month after back surgery

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The Braves’ vaunted rotation depth will be tested in April, as Tim Hudson expects to miss at least the first month of the season following back surgery on Nov. 28.

Hudson hoped to avoid the surgery and thus didn’t have it until two months after the Braves wrapped their 2011 season. That delay will cost the team in 2012.

“Me getting back for the start of the season was never really a possibility, just from a timeline standpoint,” Hudson said. “The kind of surgery I had is a three-to-sixth-month deal. Five months puts me at May 1.”

Hudson likely would have replaced Derek Lowe as the Braves’ Opening Day starter if healthy. Now that nod could go to Jair Jurrjens, though Jurrjens too is coming off an injury. If things go as hoped, Atlanta will have a rotation of Jurrjens, Tommy Hanson, Brandon Beachy, Mike Minor and either Randall Delgado or Julio Teheran initially. Kris Medlen is another candidate to step in, but the Braves would prefer to leave him in the bullpen.

Hudson went 16-10 with a 3.22 ERA in 215 innings for the Braves last season. He’s owed $9 million this year in the final guaranteed season of his contract, but barring a meltdown, his $9 million option for 2013 will surely be exercised.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.