Will the Rangers spend any money saved in a possible Koji Uehara trade?

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We learned yesterday that the Rangers were close to trading right-handed reliever Koji Uehara to the Athletics. Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reported last night that the Rangers were also talking to another team, but indicated that progress on a deal could be made this weekend.

Trading Uehara would clear his $4 million salary from the Rangers’ payroll, but the motivation to move him isn’t yet clear. However, it appears there are three likely scenarios.

Jeff Wilson of the Fort Worth-Star Telegram was told by one source yesterday afternoon that moving Uehara could free up the proper cash to make a run at free agent right-hander Roy Oswalt. Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com later speculated that the next logical move would be to bring back Mike Gonzalez, which actually makes more sense when you consider that the club is without an experienced left-hander in their bullpen at the moment. However, another source later told Wilson that any money saved in a Uehara deal would be used to help trim their payroll and not directed toward another player.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.