Feb. 18, 2012: The day the Mariners bats came alive

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Sure the Mariners finished last in the majors in runs scored in 2011 and 2010 (and last in the AL in 2009), but that’s no reason not to be optimistic in mid-February.

We’ll let Seattle Times beat writer Larry Stone take over from here:

Ichiro, Carp, and Smoak are putting on a show in their BP group. Lots of bombs.

Mike Carp, in particular, was hitting tape measure shots, scurrying the fans behind RF and whacking at least one car

Montero just missed hitting a truck driving on road beyond left field

Gutierrez showing some pop. He’s hit a couple over the wall, lots of gap liners. Physical difference is notable

From the sound of things, it looks like a massive turnaround is on the way. Fortunately, Stone does have a sense of humor abut the whole thing:

If Mariners can talk opponents into starting Jeff Datz on mound every game, they’ll be in business

For the record, the Mariners did improve from 513 runs scored to 556 runs scored last year. Of course, that still put them 63 runs behind the AL’s next worst team, Minnesota.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.