Tim Wakefield retires after 19 seasons and 200 wins

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Tim Wakefield will announce his retirement during a press conference tonight, calling it quits after a 19-season career in which the knuckleballer won 200 games despite not making his big-league debut until age 25.

Red Sox president Larry Lucchino revealed last week that the team had offered Wakefield a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training, but the 45-year-old right-hander didn’t have an obvious fit on the roster after posting a 5.12 ERA in 155 innings split between the bullpen and rotation last season.

Wakefield pitched 17 of his 19 seasons in Boston after being released by the Pirates in the spring of 1995 and has the third-most wins in Red Sox history behind Cy Young and Roger Clemens, earning $56 million along the way.

He signed a contract extension in 2006 that gave the Red Sox a perpetual team option for $4 million per season, which they picked up three times before negotiating a new deal with a lower annual salary. At the time Wakefield was 39 years old, yet he went on to throw 934 more innings with a 4.74 ERA and made his first All-Star team in 2009 at age 42.

In addition to ranking third among all Red Sox pitchers in wins, Wakefield also ranks first in starts and innings and second in games pitched and strikeouts. Not bad for a guy whose average fastball during the past decade clocked in at 74.1 miles per hour.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.