Tim Wakefield retires after 19 seasons and 200 wins


Tim Wakefield will announce his retirement during a press conference tonight, calling it quits after a 19-season career in which the knuckleballer won 200 games despite not making his big-league debut until age 25.

Red Sox president Larry Lucchino revealed last week that the team had offered Wakefield a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training, but the 45-year-old right-hander didn’t have an obvious fit on the roster after posting a 5.12 ERA in 155 innings split between the bullpen and rotation last season.

Wakefield pitched 17 of his 19 seasons in Boston after being released by the Pirates in the spring of 1995 and has the third-most wins in Red Sox history behind Cy Young and Roger Clemens, earning $56 million along the way.

He signed a contract extension in 2006 that gave the Red Sox a perpetual team option for $4 million per season, which they picked up three times before negotiating a new deal with a lower annual salary. At the time Wakefield was 39 years old, yet he went on to throw 934 more innings with a 4.74 ERA and made his first All-Star team in 2009 at age 42.

In addition to ranking third among all Red Sox pitchers in wins, Wakefield also ranks first in starts and innings and second in games pitched and strikeouts. Not bad for a guy whose average fastball during the past decade clocked in at 74.1 miles per hour.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.