harper futures getty

Does Bryce Harper really need to grow up?

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I give Bryce Harper a fair amount of hell, but it isn’t serious hell. It’s more like me shaking my head and smugly smiling at the folly of youth while simultaneously (a) understanding that young people act like young people and that’s OK; and (b) being slightly jealous that I’m an old man now and couldn’t get away with most of that stuff.

Point is: while I cringe — often — at the things Harper says and does, it’s no different than me cringing at the kids riding their skateboards around my neighborhood, imploring them to get off my lawn and the like.  Sure, it’d be cool if a young stud athlete like Harper had an unnatural maturity because it would be interesting to witness, but really, the kid is just being a kid and that’s OK.

But it’s not OK with everyone. Specifically, Jason Reid of the Washington Post, who took to his column yesterday to implore Master Harper to grow up:

Bryce Harper needs to grow up. When you’re the future of the franchise, being 19 will only get you so far. Sometimes, you need to show maturity beyond your years … Obviously, Harper is entitled to his views. After already paying Harper like a star, the Nationals want him to become one. Harper hasn’t said or done anything outright alarming. Repeatedly, though, he has exercised questionable judgment — and the Nationals know it.

The evidence cited for this is all the stuff we’ve heard about before: his desire to be like Joe Namath. The fact that he roots for teams that happened to be good and popular when he was growing up. The fact that he showboated in a couple of games last year, says goofy things on Twitter and drives an oversized Hot Wheels car.

None of which I personally approve of, of course. But as we’ve established: I’m an old man and I know it and I don’t think for a minute that Bryce Harper should do what pleases people like me because, man, that would be pretty depressing.

As long as they’re not abusing drugs and causing real chaos, let youth be young. As long as we don’t get consumed with bitterness, let old people roll our eyes at it. That’s the natural freaking order of things, and I really hope that never changes.

Drew Pomeranz: “I definitely feel like I can maybe help (as a reliever in the playoffs).”

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 5:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox pitches during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on September 5, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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Red Sox starter Drew Pomeranz hasn’t pitched in a week due to soreness in his left forearm. He threw a bullpen on Thursday afternoon and said, “I definitely feel like I can maybe help (as a reliever in the playoffs,” as ESPN’s Scott Lauber reports.

The Red Sox clinched the AL East on Wednesday, so they don’t need to rush Pomeranz along. And using him out of the bullpen might ultimately be best as he regressed quite a bit after coming to Boston from San Diego in July. In 13 starts with the Red Sox, Pomeranz has a 4.68 ERA with a 69/24 K/BB ratio in 67 1/3 innings.

Eduardo Rodriguez and Clay Buchholz have been throwing the ball quite well as of late. Paired with Rick Porcello and David Price, the Red Sox still have the depth to be menacing in the postseason.

Jesus Montero suspended 50 games for use of a stimulant

Seattle Mariners' Jesus Montero follows through on an RBI-double in the first inning of a spring training baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Saturday, March 19, 2016, in Surprise, Ariz. (John Sleezer/The Kansas City Star via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
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Remember Jesus Montero? The former Yankees and Mariners prospect? Well, he was picked up by the Blue Jays back in March after the Mariners waived him and played 126 games for Triple-A Buffalo this year. That went alright, I suppose, with Montero hitting .317/.349/.438 with 11 homers. He played a bit of first base too, trying to break the mold he’s been stuck in as a 26-year-old DH.

If this season was a platform for him to make one last push to the bigs, the platform was just pulled out from under him: he has been suspended for 50 games after testing positive for dimethylbutylamine (DMBA), a stimulant in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.

The minor league season is over, of course, so he’ll serve that suspension next season. Assuming the Jays keep him in the fold.