Yankees-Indians are talking about an A.J. Burnett for Travis Hafner deal

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UPDATE:  The talks are dead.

1:31 PM: This is interesting. Jon Heyman is reporting that while there is still optimism that the Yankees will trade A.J. Burnett to Pittsburgh, the Angels and Indians have “checked in.”

The Angels are probably a non-starter because they are one of the teams named in Burnett’s limited no-trade clause — he wants to stay in the eastern part of the continent — but the Indians are intriguing. Mostly because of what Heyman says the clubs are talking about in a potential deal: the Indians shipping Travis Hafner to New York.

Now, Heyman says that the Indians are unsure they’d do such a deal — more on that below — but it certainly would be interesting from the Yankees perspective. Hafner is a much better option for the DH slot than some of the other names being floated (Raul Ibanez, Johnny Damon). If they could snag Hafner, it would be a pretty big coup.

I can see why the Indians would balk, though. Apart from Hafner being better at he does than Burnett is at what he does, Hafner is only owned $15.75 million total by Cleveland, what with this year’s salary and the buyout of next year’s option.  Burnett is owed $33 million.  So, unless the Yankees were pitching in more money — which they’ve said they don’t want to do — Cleveland’s financial obligations would increase by a couple of million bucks, and they’d get the worse player in the deal.

So, yeah, don’t hold your breath, Yankees fans.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.