Pablo Sandoval on weight critics: “I’ll shut their mouths when spring training begins”

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Ten days ago Giants manager Bruce Bochy voiced some mild concern about Pablo Sandoval’s conditioning, offering a little dubiousness that Sandoval’s reported 25-pound weight gain was “all muscle,” and saying “he knows he has some work to do.”

Today Carlos Alberto Zambrano at Lider en Deportes — translated for us by amigo-of-HBT, Nick Collias — reported that Sandoval didn’t take too kindly to Bochy’s mild criticism and waxed defiant about it:

“I’m not interested in what people say about me. I’ll shut their mouths when spring training begins. That’s the date when I need to arrive in shape.”

“They’re going to say I’m fat because of seven pounds? Seven pounds isn’t anything. But people like to talk. I don’t pay attention to those things. I trust in what I can do on the field and always achieve my objectives.”

“I want to know what those people who’ve said bad things about me are going to say when I arrive in perfect physical condition. I don’t have more fat on my body; the truth is that I’ve gained muscle mass.”

They make you take your shirt off at spring training, dude, so I guess we’ll all know next week.  And no matter how much fat is on those bones, something tells me that Bochy isn’t going to take too kindly to being told that Sandoval is going to shut his mouth.

I mean, they won a World Series without Sandoval being particularly effective. Something tells me that Bochy would be willing to try it again if he was sufficiently pissed off about it.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: