Pablo Sandoval on weight critics: “I’ll shut their mouths when spring training begins”

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Ten days ago Giants manager Bruce Bochy voiced some mild concern about Pablo Sandoval’s conditioning, offering a little dubiousness that Sandoval’s reported 25-pound weight gain was “all muscle,” and saying “he knows he has some work to do.”

Today Carlos Alberto Zambrano at Lider en Deportes — translated for us by amigo-of-HBT, Nick Collias — reported that Sandoval didn’t take too kindly to Bochy’s mild criticism and waxed defiant about it:

“I’m not interested in what people say about me. I’ll shut their mouths when spring training begins. That’s the date when I need to arrive in shape.”

“They’re going to say I’m fat because of seven pounds? Seven pounds isn’t anything. But people like to talk. I don’t pay attention to those things. I trust in what I can do on the field and always achieve my objectives.”

“I want to know what those people who’ve said bad things about me are going to say when I arrive in perfect physical condition. I don’t have more fat on my body; the truth is that I’ve gained muscle mass.”

They make you take your shirt off at spring training, dude, so I guess we’ll all know next week.  And no matter how much fat is on those bones, something tells me that Bochy isn’t going to take too kindly to being told that Sandoval is going to shut his mouth.

I mean, they won a World Series without Sandoval being particularly effective. Something tells me that Bochy would be willing to try it again if he was sufficiently pissed off about it.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.