Carl Barger’s family isn’t happy with No. 5 being unretired for Logan Morrison

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We learned over the weekend that the Marlins were unretiring No. 5 so that Logan Morrison could wear it in memory of his father. Nice story, right? Turns out it’s a bit more complicated.

According to Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post, the family of former Marlins’ president Carl Barger didn’t hear from the team before the announcement was made.

The Marlins retired No. 5 before the franchise’s first game in honor of Barger, who died while attending the winter meetings in December of 1992. No. 5 was chosen because Joe DiMaggio was Barger’s favorite player.

“It’s disappointing. He gave his life to the Marlins,’ said Betzi Barger, who’s father Carl Barger was the Marlins’ team president from July 8, 1991 until his death on Dec. 9, 1992.

“Nobody (from the Marlins) has contacted us,’ Betzi Barger said when contacted Monday by The Palm Beach Post. “It’s just a disappointment but there’s nothing we can do. We’re sorry we didn’t find out about it except from you.’

Marlins president David Samson said it was his understanding that the Bargers had signed off on the plan, so this wasn’t a matter of Morrison enthusiastically jumping the gun. The Marlins still plan to honor Barger with a plaque at the ballpark and want his family to attend the unveiling, but Barger’s daughter isn’t sure if they’ll go. And unless there’s a pretty good explanation for the misunderstanding, it’s hard to blame them.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.