Yes, a post that involves baseball, Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries


You thought we couldn’t get any more fluffy, empty non-baseball baseball posts in today? Ha!  I have not yet neared the bottom of the barrel.  Not on your life, buster.  Get a load of this:

The Minnesota Twins are cutting ties with the Kardashians, too. Well, sort of.

The team announced Tuesday it will auction off a baseball autographed by reality starlet Kim Kardashian and her ex-husband Kris Humphries. They signed the ball before a Twins game last July, when the Minnesota native and NBA player Humphries threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

I can only presume that if Kim and Kris had stayed together that, rather than auction the ball, they would have kept it in the Twins Hall of Fame and Museum, right next to the ball from Game 7 of the 1991 World Series, Harmon Killebrew’s Bat and Kent Hrbek’s brass knuckles. But now that their fairy tale is over it is no longer worthy of honor.

By the way: money from the auction will benefit Twins charities.  Word on the street is that Gleeman understands that that purpose, and not picking up a decent cheap relief pitcher, is probably a better use of the proceeds.

But he still burns for guys like Todd Coffey. Don’t let him tell you any different.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.