Long live the East Coast Bias

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The Super Bowl is over — no, I did not watch it, I watched the last three episodes of “Mad Men” on Netflix so I’m now caught up — so as far as I’m concerned it’s now baseball season. Indeed, this is the last full week in which there is no real baseball activity, as pitchers and catchers report next week. Ahh.

But I do wish to link one article that is mostly about football because it has some relevance for us as well. It’s about why the Patriots and Giants dominated the airwaves these past couple of weeks. And, as anyone who has read my thoughts on the matter knows, it’s understandable even if annoying. Here’s ESPN Senior Vice Presidenct Mark Gross:

I know some people may say there’s a Northeast or an East Coast bias, but you can’t argue with the ratings and the interest in those games versus the other games.” According to [ESPN’s] own research, four of the nation’s top 15 favorite pro sports are from either New York or Boston. While teams such as the Yankees, Patriots, Red Sox and Giants appeal to fans in their home markets, their reach extends far beyond the back yard. More than 52 percent of Giants fans live outside of New York, according to ESPN Sports Poll data, and 57 percent of Pats fans reside outside of Boston.

And I’m sure it applies to the Yankees and Red Sox too.  Which explains why we get so much more of them in national broadcasts than anyone else. As John Ourand of SportsBusiness Journal says, east coast bias is a real thing, but “[t]elevision’s decision-makers don’t favor particular teams; they favor money.”

And if you were in their shoes you’d do the same thing. At least as long as you favored employment over unemployment.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.