Buster Posey progressing with rehab, but says ankle isn’t yet 100 percent

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Buster Posey still expects to be ready for the start of the season, but he told Rael Enteen of CSNBayArea.com during Giants’ media day yesterday that his surgically-repaired left ankle is “not 100 percent yet.”

“The games will be a whole new level and I’m excited to see how [my ankle] responds,” Posey said Friday. “I think it will respond well but it’s a long season, whether you’re 100 percent healthy or not…I’m happy with where I am and I’m optimistic for having a good, healthy season.”

Posey is currently working his way back from three torn ligaments in his left ankle and a fractured leg suffered in a nasty home plate collision with Marlins’ outfielder Scott Cousins last May. While the 24-year-old still deals with some soreness in the mornings, the good news is that he said the ankle feels good from the crouch position.

On a related note, Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News reports that Giants manager Bruce Bochy and general manager Brian Sabean are already talking about playing Posey at first base once a week, if not more, in order to keep his bat in the lineup and lessen his workload behind the plate.

“The work’s been done,” Sabean said. “(Trainer Dave) Groeschner has been pleased with where they are. But we’ll be very conscious and diligent about what his schedule will be gamewise. At the finish line is to get him ready to be the opening-day catcher and then to figure from there how many games he can catch.

“But that will evolve as we see the workload and what that ankle can tolerate. Because everything he does is weight bearing, whether it’s shifting or throwing or blocking.”

Posey started 31 games at first base during his rookie season in 2010, mostly due to the presence of Bengie Molina, and made two starts there prior to last year’s season-ending injury. If the Giants truly intend to play him at first base at least once a week, one wonders whether Brandon Belt will be Fresno-bound to begin the season.

David Wright isn’t ready to retire

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There’s no doubt that the last three years have put David Wright through the ringer. The Mets third baseman missed the bulk of his 2015 season with spinal stenosis and made it through a month of games in 2016 before undergoing season-ending surgery to repair a herniated disc in his neck. In 2017, a bout of shoulder impingement, rotator cuff surgery and a laminotomy procedure on his lower back kept him off the field for all 162 games.

Despite the continual setbacks, Wright told MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, he doesn’t believe retirement is in the cards for him this year. “When the end comes, the end comes,” he said Friday. “Hopefully, I’ve got a little more left. But I guess that’s to be determined.”

The 35-year-old last appeared for High-A St. Lucie in 2017, powering through three games with one hit and five strikeouts in 10 plate appearances. His career has advanced in fits and starts since 2015, but you don’t have to do too much digging to find his last great performance with the Mets. Wright earned his seventh career All-Star berth in 2013, slashing .307/.390/.514 with 18 home runs and a terrific 6.0 fWAR in 492 PA. While he isn’t expected to mash at those levels in the near future, if ever again, the Mets believe the veteran third baseman might still have something left in the tank as he tries to extend a 13-year run in the majors.

Per DiComo, the only thing standing in his way is a clean bill of health — not just for the upcoming season, but for the years to come. Wright said he wouldn’t risk returning to the field if it came with long-term implications for his quality of life.

The surgeries are obviously serious stuff, but it just kind of plays with your mind mentally, where you don’t know how your body’s going to hold up,” Wright said. “You don’t know how you’re going to feel a month from now. You don’t know how you’re going to feel a couple weeks from now. You’re hoping that it continues to get better, but you just don’t know.

Given the uncertainty that surrounds his return to the game, it’s a prudent outlook to have.