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Buster Posey progressing with rehab, but says ankle isn’t yet 100 percent


Buster Posey still expects to be ready for the start of the season, but he told Rael Enteen of CSNBayArea.com during Giants’ media day yesterday that his surgically-repaired left ankle is “not 100 percent yet.”

“The games will be a whole new level and I’m excited to see how [my ankle] responds,” Posey said Friday. “I think it will respond well but it’s a long season, whether you’re 100 percent healthy or not…I’m happy with where I am and I’m optimistic for having a good, healthy season.”

Posey is currently working his way back from three torn ligaments in his left ankle and a fractured leg suffered in a nasty home plate collision with Marlins’ outfielder Scott Cousins last May. While the 24-year-old still deals with some soreness in the mornings, the good news is that he said the ankle feels good from the crouch position.

On a related note, Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News reports that Giants manager Bruce Bochy and general manager Brian Sabean are already talking about playing Posey at first base once a week, if not more, in order to keep his bat in the lineup and lessen his workload behind the plate.

“The work’s been done,” Sabean said. “(Trainer Dave) Groeschner has been pleased with where they are. But we’ll be very conscious and diligent about what his schedule will be gamewise. At the finish line is to get him ready to be the opening-day catcher and then to figure from there how many games he can catch.

“But that will evolve as we see the workload and what that ankle can tolerate. Because everything he does is weight bearing, whether it’s shifting or throwing or blocking.”

Posey started 31 games at first base during his rookie season in 2010, mostly due to the presence of Bengie Molina, and made two starts there prior to last year’s season-ending injury. If the Giants truly intend to play him at first base at least once a week, one wonders whether Brandon Belt will be Fresno-bound to begin the season.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.