“I feel like we’re being invaded, like it’s 1965 all over again”

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Those are the words of Astin Jacobo, a buscon from the Dominican Republic. He, and many like him, are not at all pleased about what appears to be inevitable: Major League Baseball expanding the draft to the D.R..

Or maybe it is, um, evitable. As this story from The Economist suggests, there are some who are thinking about their options if MLB decides to go that route:

Many buscones talk of a strike. But they have not formed a union. Even if they do, they could not stop their players from opting to sign with MLB teams.

That leaves the government. Felipe Payano, the sports minister, has already written a letter to Bud Selig, MLB’s commissioner, expressing his opposition to a draft. He says his office is investigating whether it might violate the DR’s free-trade agreement with America. Another option would be to sue MLB for collusion under Dominican antitrust law.

Sounds like a pipe dream, but it does suggest the general dissatisfaction of many at how Major League Baseball seems intent on taking away the right of Dominican players to sell their services to the highest bidder.  Or, as Jacobo puts it in greater detail:

“I feel like we’re being invaded, like it’s 1965 all over again. We’re only number one in one thing, and that’s baseball. We can’t give that away.”

They won’t necessarily be giving it all away.  But they’ll definitely be selling it a much lower price if the draft comes.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.