OK, so Mark Teixeira will bunt after all

22 Comments

Yesterday I mocked the idea that the Yankees may ask their power-hitting first baseman to eschew trying to hit the ball to Yankee Stadium’s short porch in right field like God and Nature intended and, instead, try to square around to bunt or to slap it the other way when batting left-handed so as to beat the defensive over-shift.

My mocking was based somewhat on the notion that Mark Teixeira himself said that he never wanted to do that and, at least until recently, so too did Yankees hitting coach Kevin Long.  But apparently everyone is changing their tune about that. From ESPN New York, here’s what Teixeira said last night:

“I’ve been so against it my entire career, but I might lay down a few bunts. If I can beat the shift that way, that’s important … I’m not going to complain about hitting 39 home runs, but I’d love to bring my [.248] average up, and it’s very simple, it’s left-handed singles.”

Eh. Fine, if he can actually handle the bat well enough to bunt it to the left side, go ahead and try it. At least to keep ’em honest. But I’m struggling to think of a power hitter who tried such a thing who had any success doing it at all. And if he can’t pull it off, the shift is just gonna get into his head more.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
1 Comment

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.