de la rosa getty

Jorge De La Rosa pitched through pain, lied about injury before Tommy John surgery

2 Comments

As Jorge De La Rosa progresses in his comeback from Tommy John elbow surgery Thomas Harding of MLB.com revealed some interesting details about how the veteran left-hander pitched through the pain initially and lied to the Rockies about the injury.

Harding of course doesn’t frame the information that way, calling it merely “stretching the truth,” but you can judge for yourself:

“It was real cold that day in Pittsburgh, and I felt something in my arm,” said De La Rosa. “I said it was a blister and they took me out of the game. I told them I would be OK. But I was not. It was weakness. The next day, I felt pain when I woke up.”

De La Rosa toughed out eight more starts, until May 24 when his elbow went during a start against the D-backs at Coors Field. He tried telling Rockies manager Jim Tracy and head athletic trainer Keith Dugger that the problem was his groin, but this time no one was fooled. Shortly thereafter, De La Rosa underwent season-ending Tommy John ligament transfer surgery.

Athletes are constantly praised for playing through injuries and in this case De La Rosa somehow managed to continue pitching relatively well, but he also lied about a significant elbow problem and told the people paying him $10 million per season that it was a blister and then a groin injury.

Yet based on Harding’s article you’d almost think the lies were a positive thing, because he writes that De La Rosa is “no longer burdened with harboring a secret impossible to keep” and “now the Rockies are making sure the gritty attitude that led De La Rosa to hide his injury doesn’t work against him in his comeback.”

Well, that’s certainly one way to put it. He’ll make $10 million this season and is aiming to return in late May or early June.

Zack Greinke named the Dbacks’ Opening Day starter

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21:  Pitcher Zack Greinke #21 of the Arizona Diamondbacks poses for a portrait during photo day at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on February 21, 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

Not a surprise, but a news item on a slow news day is a news item on a slow news day: Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo has named Zack Greinke as the club’s Opening Day starter.

Greinke’s first season with the Diamondbacks is not exactly what the club hoped for when he signed a six-year, $206.5 million deal in December of 2015. He dealt with oblique and shoulder issues while struggling to a 4.37 ERA over 26 starts. Greinke hasn’t pitched yet this spring, but will make his spring debut on Friday. He and the club are obviously hoping for a quiet March and a strong beginning to the season.

Either for its own sake or to increase the trade value of a player who was acquired by the previous front office regime.

“La Vida Baseball,” celebrating Latino baseball, launches

screen-shot-2017-03-01-at-10-53-41-am
5 Comments

A new website has launched. It’s called “La Vida Baseball,” and it’s all about celebrating the past, present and future of Latino baseball from a Latino perspective.

The site, produced in partnership with the Hall of Fame, has four general areas of focus:

  • Who’s Now: Focusing on current Latino players;
  • Who’s Next: Focusing on top prospects here, in the Caribbean and in Central and South America;
  • Our Life: Off-the-Field stuff, including player’s lives, lifestyles and hobbies; and
  • Our Legends: Focusing on Latino baseball history, Hall of Famers and overlooked players.

As the site has just launched there aren’t yet a ton of stories up there, but there is one about Roberto Clemente, another about Felix Hernandez and some other stuff.

The site is much-needed. Baseball reporters for American outlets are overwhelmingly white, non-Spanish speakers. Reporters, who, generally, gravitate to the players who are the most like they are. Which is understandable on some level. When you’re writing stories about people you need to be able to communicate with them and relate to them on more than a mere perfunctory level. As such, no matter how good the intentions of baseball media, we tend to see the clubhouse and the culture of baseball from a distinctly American perspective. And we tend to paint Latino players with a broad, broad brush.

La Vida Baseball will, hopefully, remedy all of that and will, hopefully, give us a fresh and insightful depiction Latino players and their culture.