Ken Harvey

The worst All-Stars of all-time

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Even with rosters expanded and more and more players seemingly sitting out the game, there aren’t quite as many bad All-Stars as their used to be, at least not by my research. The list of the worst All-Stars is mostly comprised of old timers, but I’ve squeezed a couple of more recent players in. Here’s an All-Star team of the worst players to make an All-Star team. I’m going by career value here, not necessarily how they performed in their All-Star seasons.

Catcher: Steve Swisher – 1976 – Career WAR: -2.6

Best known now as Nick’s pop, Swisher reached the majors just a year after the White Sox made him a first-round pick and played nine years in the bigs, though he had fewer than 75 at-bats in four of those. He made the All-Star team in his one season of fairly regular play. He went on to hit .236/.275/.326 for the Cubs that year.

First base: Ken Harvey – 2004 – Career WAR: -1.2

Harvey was the Royals’ lone All-Star in his second and final year as a regular. He hit a respectable .287/.338/.421 in 456 at-bats on the season, but since he was a poor defender, he still ended up with a negative WAR. The Royals had him battle big Calvin Pickering for a starting job the following spring. He lost out and ended up getting just 45 more at-bats in the majors.

Second base: Carlos Garcia – 1994 – Career WAR: -0.8

A decent offensive second baseman, Garcia hit .269/.316/.399 as a rookie with the Pirates in 1993. He made the All-Star team in the worst of his four full years with the club, as he hit .277/.309/.367 in 1994. He bounced back to .294/.340/.420 the next year, but his poor glove knocked him out of the league a few years later.

Third base: Ken Reitz – 1980 – Career WAR: -4.2

Reitz was in the lineup for his defense — he won a Gold Glove in 1975 before Mike Schmidt established a stranglehold on the award — but WAR actually says he was below average throughout his career. His All-Star nod came in his last of seven seasons as a regular with the Cardinals, in which he hit .270/.300/.379. That OBP was the highest mark of his career.

Shortstops: Joe DeMastri – 1957 – Career WAR: -4.9

Baseball reference gives DeMastri the worst WAR of any player to make an All-Star team. He did so with the A’s in 1957, when he hit .245/.280/.360 in 461 at-bats. At least DeMastri deserves points for consistency: he had 6-9 homers and 33-40 RBI in all seven of his seasons as a regular.

Left field: Gino Cimoli – 1957 – Career WAR: 0.0

It must have been quite a thrill for Cimoli, in his first full season, to play behind Frank Robinson, Willie Mays and Hank Aaron in the 1957 All-Star Game. He hit .293/.343/.410 with 10 homers and 57 RBI for the Dodgers as a 27-year-old that season. Baseball-reference WAR credits him with 3.1 wins that season and negative -3.1 wins for the other nine years of his career.

Center Field: Cito Gaston – 1970 – Career WAR: -2.5

For the most part, the other players on this list got their All-Star bids by being on bad teams. Gaston, though, was a very deserving All-Star in 1970, hitting .318/.364/.543 with 29 homers and 93 RBI for the Padres. It was just his second full season and expectations were high. Gaston, though, lost 90 points off his average in 1971 and never bounced all of the way back. He did manage to resurrect his career as a pretty good bench player for the Braves later in the decade, but WAR says he was pretty much always a terrible defender.

Right field: Myril Hoag – 1939 – Career WAR: -4.8

The bad news is that Hoag was traded from the Yankees to the woeful Browns after the 1938 season. The good news was that he got an All-Star appearance out of it. It was his best season, as he hit .295/.329/.421 with 10 homers and 75 RBI.

Starting pitcher: Tyler Green – 1995 – Career WAR: -1.1

Not to be confused with fellow Phillies starter Tommy Greene, Tyler Green was the 10th overall pick in the 1991 draft. As a rookie in 1995, he was a cool 8-4 with a 2.75 ERA after three months, getting him the All-Star spot. He then went 0-5 with a 9.63 ERA the rest of the way, missed the following season with a torn labrum and went 10-16 in his final two seasons.

Reliever: Ed Farmer – 1980 – Career WAR: -0.5

The current White Sox radio broadcaster made the All-Star team on his way to getting 30 saves for the 1980 White Sox. He was hardly dominant, though, finishing with a 3.34 ERA and more walks (56) than strikeouts (54) in 99 2/3 innings out of the pen. Overall, he had a 4.30 ERA in 624 innings.

Diamondbacks sign Jorge De La Rosa to minor league deal

ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 10:  Jorge De La Rosa #29 of the Colorado Rockies throws against the Texas Rangers in the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on August 10, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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The Diamondbacks have signed free agent left-hander Jorge De La Rosa to a minor league deal, per a team announcement on Sunday. The contract includes an invitation to spring training. Nick Piecoro of AZCentral.com adds that De La Rosa stands to make $2.25 million if he secures a spot on the major league roster, with up to $600,000 in incentives if he pitches out of the bullpen and up to $1 million in incentives if he pitches out of the starting rotation.

The 35-year-old is expected to compete for a bullpen role after spending the better part of a decade in the Rockies’ rotation. He capped a nine-year run with Colorado in 2016, finishing the year with a 5.51 ERA, 4.2 BB/9 and 7.3 SO/9 over 134 innings. Despite his struggles out of the rotation, he found limited success in a three-game stint in the bullpen, striking out 10 of 26 batters and holding the opposition to just three hits and one earned run in eight innings.

The veteran lefty is set to join a bullpen comprised of right-handers Randall Delgado, Jake Barrett and Fernando Rodney, along with a number of unproven candidates on similar minor league contracts. His age and command issues may be off-putting, but the promise he showed as a reliever should give the Diamondbacks some upside as they attempt to redeem a league-worst bullpen in 2017.

Josh Donaldson out 2-3 weeks with calf injury

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 13: Josh Donaldson #20 of the Toronto Blue Jays looks on from the top step of the dugout as he sits out his second straight game during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 13, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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Blue Jays’ third baseman Josh Donaldson is expected to miss up to three weeks with a right calf strain, reports John Lott. Donaldson reportedly felt some discomfort in his calf during sprinting drills on Friday and was diagnosed with what looked like a mild strain after undergoing an MRI on Saturday. According to Lott, the 31-year-old is on crutches for the next few days and will likely miss 2-3 weeks of spring training.

Donaldson had a similar scare at the start of the 2016 season, when he limped out of the batter’s box during the Blue Jays’ first regular season road trip with a right calf strain. He returned to DH two days later, however, and was back on the field in less than a week’s time. Blue Jays’ GM Ross Atkins told MLB.com’s Corey Long that the two calf injuries are unrelated, and expects that Donaldson will recover in similar fashion this spring — well before Opening Day comes around.