Los_Angeles_Dodgers_Logo

Mark Cuban out of the running for Dodgers; Joe Torre and Magic Johnson among those still in

20 Comments

UPDATE: The Steve Garvey-Orel Hershiser group was not selected to advance in the bidding process, reports Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times.

As for the actual bid amounts, well, let’s just say that Frank McCourt is going to walk away from this process filthy, stinkin’ rich. Buster Olney of ESPN.com hears that bidding on the Dodgers is now north of $1.2 billion and counting. Meanwhile, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reports that McCourt already has one bid in the range of $1.5 billion and speculates that the bidding may jump to $2 billion before this is all over. Either way, the final price tag is expected to blow away the previous record of $845 million when the Ricketts family bought the Cubs from the Tribune Company in 2009.

10:44 PM, Friday: Well, we can cross two big names off the list. Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times has learned that the groups led by Mark Cuban and former agent Dennis Gilbert didn’t make it to the second round of the bidding process. St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke is still in.

Meanwhile, Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com hears that Peter O’Malley’s group and the group led by Stanley Gold (who runs the investment firm for the family of the late Roy Disney) have also advanced. O’Malley has reportedly discussed joining forces with Gold’s group.

9:30 PM, Friday: We learned earlier this week that the Dodgers received more than 10 opening bids in advance of Monday’s deadline from those interested in buying the team from Frank McCourt. The opening bids aren’t binding and new bidders could still emerge in the days to come, but we have some early word on who made it through to the next round.

Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that at least eight groups have advanced, including the Magic Johnson/Stan Kasten group, the Joe Torre/Rick Caruso group and the group headed by hedge fund manager Steven Cohen. No word on any others, but it’s safe to say most of the big names are sticking around.

The Dodgers released a statement a little while ago confirming that “the round of preliminary bidding has been completed successfully.” However, they didn’t say who advanced or provide a timeline for the next step.

The embattled McCourt faces an April 30 deadline to sell the team and has agreed to identify the winning bidder by April 1. The sale is expected to fetch an MLB record price tag in excess of $1 billion.

Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
5 Comments

The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
14 Comments

On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.