Must-click link: The Scott Boras origin story

32 Comments

Every superhero has an origin story. They were sent here from a doomed alien world. They were bit by a radioactive spider. Their parents were murdered in Crime Alley. Whatever the hell boring stuff happened to Aquaman to make him the mediocre whatever-it-is he is.

Scott Boras may not be in the Justice League, but by convincing a team that already had a first baseman and a DH to give Prince Fielder $214 million, he is certainly a superhero of some kind. Probably has mind control powers and the like.  And like every other superhero, he has an origin story. And, as expected, it involves Bill Caudill.

Oh, you don’t know that story? In that case, go read Sam Miller’s account of Scott Boras’ first free agent deal over at Baseball Prospectus.

It’s fascinating, because it shows that even at the tender age of 31, Scott Boras was already doing the things he does today. Comically exaggerating his clients’ talents. Asking for silly money. Having, seemingly, no shame.  And like today, that stuff worked wonderfully and neither Boras nor his clients had then nor have now any reason to hide from it, because it’s effective.

Like Superman’s heat vision, Batman’s skull-cracking, Spiderman’s web-slinging and Aquaman’s, well, whatever it is he does, Boras has a gift, it’s apparently unstoppable and there’s no reason at all to change his approach until it stops working.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
2 Comments

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.