Top 111 Free Agents: the post-Prince Fielder update

14 Comments

In light of the Prince Fielder signing, here’s an updated look at how this year’s top 111 free agents have fared.

1. Albert Pujols (Cardinals): Angels – 10 years, $254 million
2. Prince Fielder (Brewers): Tigers – 9 years, $214 million
3. Jose Reyes (Mets): Marlins – 6 years, $106 million
4. C.J. Wilson (Rangers): Angels – 5 years, $77.5 million
5. Jimmy Rollins (Phillies): Phillies – 3 years, $38 million
6. Jonathan Papelbon (Red Sox): Phillies – 4 years, $50 million
7. Mark Buehrle (White Sox): Marlins – 4 years, $58 million
8. Carlos Beltran (Giants): Cardinals – 2 years, $26 million
9. Edwin Jackson (Cardinals)
10. Aramis Ramirez (Cubs): Brewers – 3 years, $36 million
11. David Ortiz (Red Sox): Red Sox – accepted arbitration
12. Heath Bell (Padres): Marlins – 3 years, $27 million
13. Michael Cuddyer (Twins): Rockies – 3 years, $31.5 million
14. Ryan Madson (Phillies): Reds – 1 year, $8.5 million
15. Hiroki Kuroda (Dodgers): Yankees – 1 year, $10 million
16. Francisco Rodriguez (Brewers): Brewers – accepted arbitration
17. Josh Willingham (Athletics): Twins: 3 years. $21 million
18. Roy Oswalt (Phillies)
19. Jason Kubel (Twins): Diamondbacks – 2 years, $15 million
20. Javier Vazquez (Marlins)
21. Paul Maholm (Pirates): Cubs – 1 year, $4.75 million
22. Kelly Johnson (Blue Jays): Blue Jays – accepted arbitration
23. Hisashi Iwakuma (Japan): Mariners – 1 year, $1.5 million
24. Francisco Cordero (Reds): Blue Jays – 1 year, $4.5 million
25. Grady Sizemore (Indians): Indians – 1 year, $5 million
26. Erik Bedard (Red Sox): Pirates – 1 year, $4.5 million
27. Carlos Pena (Cubs): Rays – 1 year, $7.25 million
28. Tsuyoshi Wada (Japan): Orioles – 2 years, $8.15 million
29. Coco Crisp (Athletics): Athletics – 2 years, $14 million
30. Casey Kotchman (Rays)
31. David DeJesus (Athletics): Cubs – 2 years, $10 million
32. Rafael Furcal (Cardinals): Cardinals – 2 years, $14 million
33. Derrek Lee (Pirates)
34. Joel Pineiro (Angels): Phillies – 1 year, minor league deal
35. Clint Barmes (Astros): Pirates – 2 years, $10.5 million
36. Jason Marquis (D-backs): Twins – 1 year, $3 million
37. Aaron Hill (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $11 million
38. Johnny Damon (Rays)
39. Bruce Chen (Royals): Royals – 2 years, $9 million
40. Joe Nathan (Twins): Rangers – 2 years, $14.75 million
41. Bartolo Colon (Yankees): Athletics: 1 year, $2 million
42. Vladimir Guerrero (Orioles)
43. Cody Ross (Giants): Red Sox – 1 year, $3 million
44. Aaron Harang (Padres): Dodgers – 2 years, $12 million
45. Jonathan Broxton (Dodgers): Royals – 1 year, $4.5 million
46. Ryan Ludwick (Pirates): Reds – 1 year, $2.5 million
47. Matt Capps (Twins): Twins – 1 year, $4.75 million
48. Ramon Hernnandez (Reds): Rockies – 2 years, $6.4 million
49. Mark Ellis (Rockies): Dodgers – 2 years, $8.75 million
50. Freddy Garcia (Yankees): Yankees – 1 year, $4 million
51. Wilson Betemit (Tigers): Orioles – 2 years, $3.5 million
52. Darren Oliver (Rangers): Blue Jays – 1 year, $4 million
53. Frank Francisco (Blue Jays): Mets – 2 years, $12 million
54. Juan Rivera (Dodgers): Dodgers – 1 year, $4.5 million
55. Chris Capuano (Mets): Dodgers – 2 years, $10 million
56. Hideki Matsui (Athletics)
57. Brad Lidge (Phillies)
58. J.D. Drew (Red Sox)
59. Ramon Santiago (Tigers): Tigers – 2 years, $4 million
60. Juan Pierre (White Sox)
61. Chien-Ming Wang (Nationals): Nationals – 1 year, $4 million
62. Alex Gonzalez (Braves): Brewers – 1 year, $4.25 million
63. Ryan Doumit (Pirates): Twins – 1 year, $3 million
64. Jim Thome (Indians): Phillies – 1 year, $1.25 million
65. Kerry Wood (Cubs): Cubs – 1 year, $3 million
66. Rich Harden (Athletics)
67. Casey Blake (Dodgers): Rockies – 1 year, $2 million
68. Octavio Dotel (Cardinals): Tigers – 1 year, $3.5 million
69. Magglio Ordonez (Tigers)
70. Jon Garland (Dodgers)
71. Yuniesky Betancourt (Brewers): Royals – 1 year, $2 million
72. Kosuke Fukudome (Indians)
73. Jamey Carroll (Dodgers): Twins – 2 years, $6.75 million
74. Brad Penny (Tigers)
75. LaTroy Hawkins (Brewers): Angels – 1 year, $3 million
76. Rod Barajas (Dodgers): Pirates – 1 year, $4 million
77. Chad Qualls (Padres)
78. Jeff Francis (Royals)
79. Raul Ibanez (Phillies)
80. Jon Rauch (Blue Jays): Mets – 1 year, $3.5 million
81. Chris Snyder (Pirates): Astros – 1 year
82. Jonny Gomes (Nationals): Athletics – 1 year, $1.1 million
83. Takashi Saito (Brewers) : Diamondbacks – 1 year, $1.75 million
84. Jorge Posada (Yankees): Retired
85. Mike Gonzalez (Rangers)
86. Laynce Nix (Nationals): Phillies – 2 years, $2.5 million
87. Nate McLouth (Braves): Pirates – 1 year, $1.5 million
88. Livan Hernandez (Nationals)
89. Michael Wuertz (Athletics)
90. Jason Varitek (Red Sox)
91. Jerry Hairston Jr. (Brewers): Dodgers – 2 years, $6 million
92. Andruw Jones (Yankees): Yankees – 1 year, $2 million
93. Fernando Rodney (Angels): Rays – 1 year, $2 million
94. Jason Isringhausen (Mets)
95. Willie Bloomquist (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $3.8 million
96. Scott Hairston (Mets): Mets – 1 year, $1.1 million
97. Kevin Millwood (Rockies): Mariners – 1 year, minor league deal
98. Todd Coffey (Nationals)
99. Kelly Shoppach (Rays): Red Sox – 1 year, $1.35 million
100. Ben Sheets (n/a)
101. Ronny Cedeno (Pirates): Mets – 1 year, $1.1 million
102. Lyle Overbay (D-backs): D-backs – 1 year, $1 million
103. Juan Cruz (Rays)
104. Aaron Cook (Rockies): Red Sox – 1 year, minor league deal
105. Reed Johnson (Cubs): Cubs – 1 year, $1.15 million
106. Guillermo Mota (Giants): Giants – 1 year, $1 million
107. Ivan Rodriguez (Nationals)
108. Zach Duke (D-backs)
109. Dan Wheeler (Red Sox)
110. Mark DeRosa (Giants): Nationals – 1 year, $800,000
111. Chris Young (Mets)

The Nats are going to sign Francisco Rodriguez for some reason

Getty Images
2 Comments

The Nationals bullpen is a tire fire. They’re about to add another tire. Per Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Washington is about to sign free agent reliever Francisco Rodriguez.

K-Rod was released by the Tigers last week after posting an ERA of 7.82 over 28 appearances this season. He has a 1.658 WHIP, is allowing 11.9 hits per nine innings and is posting his highest walk rate in five years. Also worth noting: the Detroit Friggin’ Tigers decided that he was not good enough to be in their bullpen.

So, yeah, good luck with that Washington.

The Giants chemistry is suffering because a guy they all hated is gone

Getty Images
8 Comments

I’ve spent years arguing with people about team chemistry. You know the battle lines on all of that now: people who talk a lot about team chemistry tend to attribute winning or losing to good or bad chemistry, respectively. I tend to think that characterizing chemistry is a retroactive exercise in which teams that win are happy and then cite their happiness as the reason and vice versa. Jim Leyland agrees with me, for what it’s worth, so I’m pretty happy with my take.

Not that I’ll claim a monopoly on wisdom here. I’ve never played on a professional baseball team. I don’t know what it’s like to try to prepare to play baseball while surrounded by jackwagons who don’t get along with anyone. I can’t imagine that makes life easier. Indeed, based on the testimony of players I have spoken to, I will grant that there is at least some intangible yet real benefit if everyone is happy an gelling. I dismiss team chemistry arguments for the most part, but if I ran a team I’d at least try to get rid of bad seeds if their bad seeding was not outweighed by seriously outstanding on-the-field play. You want your workers happy, folks.

All of which makes me wonder what the heck to do about this passage from Ken Rosenthal’s latest column. It’s about the reeling San Francisco Giants. They have all kinds of issues — their offense is putrid, their pitching isn’t much better and they’ve been without their ace most of the year — but today Rosenthal looks at their team chemistry. It’s a quiet and subdued clubhouse, he notes, and it has a lot of people wondering if something is wrong there. What could it be?

Sandoval, who was an often noisy and boisterous presence during his time with the club, departed as a free agent after that season. Pence has suffered a number of injuries in recent years and declined offensively, making it difficult for him to be as vocal as he was in the past. Some with the Giants muse that the team even misses Angel Pagan, who created an odd sort of unity because most of the players disliked him.

Read that last sentence again. And then go on with your talk about how team chemistry is a legitimate explanatory concept regarding what makes teams win or lose as opposed to a post-hoc rationalization of it.

Not that it’s not a good article overall. There’s some interesting stuff about the Giants’ bullpen culture. And, of course, we now know why no one signed Pagan last winter.