Why did the Red Sox dump Marco Scutaro and his salary?


I’m among the people confused by Boston’s move to dump Marco Scutaro and his $6 million salary on the Rockies for a marginal minor leaguer in Clayton Mortensen, in part because Scutaro was hardly overpaid and in part because the Red Sox’s in-house options to replace him at shortstop are so underwhelming.

It still doesn’t make much sense to me, but Alex Speier of WEEI.com offers a few details that explain the situation somewhat.

For instance, Speier notes that because of the wording of Scutaro’s contract the Red Sox would have taken a sizable luxury tax hit if they’d simply declined his 2012 option, so instead they exercised the option and then dumped him on the Rockies (who have no such luxury tax concerns).

There’s been plenty of speculation that the Red Sox shed Scutaro’s salary in order to make a run at Roy Oswalt and in the meantime they sliced nearly $8 million in money as it’s counted against the luxury tax. Speier reports that the Rockies were the only team willing to take on Scutaro’s entire salary.

As for why they’d trade Scutaro without having a good shortstop replacement waiting in the wings–particularly after parting with Jed Lowrie earlier this offseason–Speier points to the fact that he’s 36 years old, somewhat injury prone, and perhaps declining defensively. And for now at least the Red Sox feel more comfortable than you might expect with a time share between Mike Aviles and Nick Punto.

Whether or not all that adds up to the Scutaro salary dump being a smart move by the Red Sox is another issue–I’d still vote no, certainly–but at least it makes a little more sense than it did at the time.

Report: Alex Cobb expected to sign soon

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Update (5:36 PM ET): Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports the Orioles are close to an agreement with Cobb. The contract is believed to be at least three years and in the range of $50 million.


Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that free agent pitcher Alex Cobb is expected to sign with a team soon. He notes that the Orioles are believed to be the favorite for Cobb’s services. Cobb has kept pushing for a multi-year contract rather than settling for a one-year deal.

Cobb, 30, posted a 3.66 ERA with a 128/44 K/BB ratio in 179 1/3 innings for the Rays last season.

If Baltimore is indeed his next destination, Cobb will provide a much-needed boost to the Orioles’ starting rotation, which currently includes Kevin Gausman, Dylan Bundy, Andrew Cashner, and Chris Tillman.