Norichika Aoki took a big pay cut to leave Japan for Brewers

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For most Japanese players coming to America the amount a team bids to secure their exclusive negotiating rights through the posting process ends up being similar to the amount they sign for during the 30-day window.

For instance, the Rangers bid $51.7 million for Yu Darvish and then signed him to a six-year, $60 million deal yesterday.

Norichika Aoki’s situation played out similarly, as the Brewers bid $2.5 million to secure the 30-year-old outfielder’s rights and then inked him to a two-year deal worth $2.25 million plus incentives.

According to the Associated Press he’s taking a big pay cut to play in the majors, as Aoki earned $4.2 million in Japan last season. Milwaukee will pay him $1 million this season and $1.25 million in 2013, with a team option for 2014. If the option is picked up and he reaches every possible incentives, Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com reports that Aoki would get $8.6 million for three years.

In other words he’s being paid like a bench player, which is the role Aoki will likely fill once the Brewers are at full strength in the outfield. However, if Ryan Braun ends up serving his 50-game suspension Aoki will get a chance to play regularly as his replacement in left field.

 

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.