Cubs, Red Sox punt; ask Bud Selig to solve the Theo compensation issue

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It occurs to me on occasion that someone stumbling onto a headline like that will not comprehend it at all unless they already know everything about the issue it refers to, in which case the post is kind of pointless to begin with.

Sorry. Feeling existential this morning.

Anyway, the headline does kind of say it all.  Unable to come to any kind of agreement on what kind of compensation the Red Sox are owed by the Cubs for hiring Theo Epstein away, the sides have asked Bud Selig to make a decision. Gordon Wittenmyer of the Sun-Times:

It’s unclear how long Selig will take. Also unclear is whether the solution will involve ordering a specific player or players to the Red Sox or setting parameters. There appears to be no precedent for it.

Hmm, a complicated issue with little or no precedent is being put on Bud Selig’s plate.  In that case the question isn’t what the solution will look like. It’s all about who’s gonna be on the blue ribbon committee and what epoch will the Earth find itself in when a report is finally released.

Snark aside, this is probably the right call. I’m not sure how the parties here can possibly negotiate about what Epstein is worth without it being insanely awkward.  The Cubs have to be in the position of saying that he’s not worth anything of value or else they’re not zealously negotiating, and that makes them look bad. The Red Sox have to be in the position of saying he’s worth the moon, and that makes them look bad for allowing him to leave.

Oh well. The best part: ultimately there’s going to be some minor leaguer or something who is sent to Boston who has 50 reporters mob him and ask what it feels like to be worth a year of Theo Epstein’s services. Which should be fun.

Jered Weaver announces his retirement

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Jered Weaver, a 12-year big league veteran and a three-time All-Star, has announced his retirement.

Weaver was struggling mightily with the Padres this year, going 0-5 in nine starts and posting a 7.44 ERA,, a 2.6 BB/9 and 4.9 K/9 ratio over 42.1 innings. He hadn’t posted a sub-4.00 ERA since 2014 and his velocity had, quite famously, sunk into the low 80s and even high 70s at times in recent seasons. A spate of physical setbacks contributed to that, with a hip inflammation ailing him this season and nerve issues in his neck and back afflicting him for the past few years.

But even if his recent seasons have been less-than-memorable, it’s worth remembering that he was, for a time, one of baseball’s best pitchers. He posted a record of 131-69 with a 3.28 ERA in his first 9 seasons, leading the American League in strikeouts in 2010 and leading the circuit in wins in 2012 and 2014. He likewise led the league in WHIP and hits allowed per nine innings in 2012.

He finishes his career with a record of 150-98, an ERA of 3.63 (ERA+ of 111) and a K/BB ratio of 1,621/551 in 2,067.1 innings. He pitched in four American League Division Series and the 2009 ALCS, posting a 2.67 ERA in seven playoff games pitched.

Happy trails, Jered. A first-ballot induction into the Hall of He Was Really Dang Good, Even if We Forgot About It For A While is in your future.

The Jose Fernandez statue may be in jeopardy

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Last November it was reported that the Marlins planned to build a memorial for Jose Fernandez, likely including a statue. The effort was said to be a pet project of the Marlins owner, Jeff Loria, who was close with Fernandez.

Today the Miami Herald reports, however, that those plans are in limbo due to the sale of the team:

The planned statue to honor Jose Fernandez, which was departing owner Jeffrey Loria’s idea, is now very much in question because it will not be erected before Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter take over, and it will ultimately be the new owners’ call. That matter has not yet been discussed, with the sale agreed to only in the past few days.

There’s nothing in the report suggesting that they’re opposed to the statue — it’s possible this was placed in the Herald by people close to the new group in order to test the waters — but there always was the sense that the idea was something of a priority for Loria personally. One wonders how much momentum it will have once he’s gone.

Then, of course, there’s the fact that Fernandez was eventually found to have been under the influence of alcohol and cocaine and was behind the wheel of the boat at the time of the accident that claimed his life and the life of two others, making any memorial to him suspect in the eyes of some people.

Thankfully we don’t spend a lot of time and energy discussing the ethics of statues in this country, so I’m sure it’ll have no bearing on the matter.