Setup man Juan Carlos Oviedo gets $6 million from Marlins to bypass arbitration

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Juan Carlos Oviedo–formerly known as Leo Nunez–has avoided arbitration with the Marlins with a one-year, $6 million deal.

Oviedo earned $3.65 million last season while saving 36 games, so he would have been in line for a sizable raise via arbitration.

However, paying $6 million for a setup man is awfully expensive, particularly since the Marlins gave new closer Heath Bell a three-year, $27 million deal.

When the Marlins decided to tender a contract to Oviedo back in mid-December it seemed like an odd move in light of the Bell signing and the assumption was that they felt confident about being able to trade him to a team looking for a closer.

Of course, the closer market has been so buyer-friendly this offseason that far superior guys like Ryan Madson are stuck taking one-year deals, so it’s hard to imagine much interest in Oviedo for $6 million. He threw 64 innings with a 4.06 ERA and 55/21 K/BB ratio last season, giving him a 4.34 ERA in 357 career innings at age 30.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.