Yankees, Hiroki Kuroda agree to one-year, $10 million deal

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The Yankees are set to acquire right-hander Michael Pineda from the Mariners in a four-player deal, but they aren’t done improving their rotation. Jack Curry of YES Network reports that they have agreed to terms with Hiroki Kuroda on a one-year deal worth between $10-11 million, pending a physical. ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that it’s for $10 million.

Kuroda, who turns 37 in February, earned $12 million last season while posting a 3.07 ERA and 161/49 K/BB ratio over 202 innings. He has a 3.45 ERA since coming over to the United States four years ago.

The Yankees tried to acquire Kuroda at the deadline last year, but he wasn’t willing to waive his no-trade clause. The common line of thinking after the season was that the veteran right-hander would either pitch in Los Angeles or return to his native Japan to pitch for the Hiroshima Carp, but he changed his stance after the Dodgers added Chris Capuano and Aaron Harang earlier this winter.

In less than an hour, the Yankees rotation has improved by leaps and bounds. They are now projected to have CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Michael Pineda, Ivan Nova and likely a three-way battle between A.J. Burnett, Phil Hughes and Freddy Garcia for fifth spot. Burnett is still owed $33 million over the next two seasons, so he would presumably have the upper hand. The depth is nice to have, but it will be interesting to see whether the Yankees use Hughes as a chip for a hitter if they are underwhelmed by some of the DH-types remaining on the free agent market.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.