Must-click link: Rob Neyer on “integrity” and “character”

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We hear so much about the steroids guys being kept out of the Hall of Fame because they fail the “integrity and character” test.  Specifically, the language right on the ballot that instructs the voters to consider “the player’s record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.”

Over at SB Nation, Rob Neyer asks why, all of a sudden, that standard is being considered when it was never considered before. At least not consistently.  And this isn’t about Ty Cobb being a racist or any of that stuff we usually hear. This is specifically about the character and integrity shown by baseball players — or rather, the lack of it — in a manner which had a material impact on the game.  His example: Mickey Mantle:

But integrity and character? Really? Even leaving aside Mickey Mantle’s thousands of infidelities and the fact that he essentially turned all of his sons into alcoholics and drug addicts, there’s the little matter of him abusing his body throughout his career. Mantle is famous for arriving at the ballpark with hangovers. In fact, those stories are often told as jokes; it’s so funny that a well-paid superstar routinely wasn’t in condition to play his best. Hilarious stuff.

Just so we’re straight on this, though … If you routinely drink yourself into a stupor and show up for work half-drunk, you’ve got more integrity and character than if you do whatever you can to play as well as you can, within the established norms of your contemporary colleagues?

People like to grab on to the word “cheating” when it comes to steroids and claim that it makes what the PED guys did so much worse than anything that came before.  But the standard itself isn’t about whether a rule was broken. Lots of rules have been broken in baseball and we don’t care all that much.  The standard is about “integrity and character.”

Rob submits — and I agree with him — that letting your teammates down by not taking care of yourself shows just as much if not more of a lack of integrity and character than taking PEDs do.  And if we’re OK with the Mickey Mantles of the world behaving in such a way and making it into the Hall of Fame, then we should not treat the PED guys any differently.

Felix Hernandez dealing with “dead arm”

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Mariners starter Felix Hernandez is dealing with “dead arm” and will head back to Seattle to have his shoulder examined, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Hernandez was reportedly visibly upset and left the clubhouse quickly, declining to speak to the media, Divish adds.

Hernandez wasn’t long for Tuesday’s game against the Tigers, as he lasted just two innings, yielding four runs on six hits and two walks with two strikeouts. The Mariners went on to lose 19-9. Hernandez is now carrying a 4.73 ERA over his first five starts.

Not much else can go wrong for the Mariners, who are now 8-13 in last place in the AL West. Mitch Haniger also suffered an oblique injury on Tuesday, joining what is becoming a lengthy list of dinged-up Mariners.

Video: Chris Coghlan dives home to beat the tag

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Blue Jays pinch-hitter Chris Coghlan found a creative way to beat the tag from Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina in the top of the seventh inning of Tuesday night’s game.

With the score tied 2-2, the Jays had a runner on first base and one out as Kevin Pillar faced reliever Matt Bowman. Pillar drove a 1-1 fastball to deep right field. Stephen Piscotty leaped in an attempt to make the catch, but the ball caromed off the wall and back towards the field. Coghlan, who was on first, made his way around third towards home. Piscotty threw home past the cutoff man and the ball reached Molina on several bounces. As Molina went low to apply the tag, Coghlan went high, leaping into the air and somersaulting into home plate to score the go-ahead run.

The Blue Jays would go on to score two in the inning, but the Cardinals answered with two of their own in the bottom half of the seventh. As of this writing, the score remains tied at four apiece.