No one thinks Bud Selig is retiring

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Bud Selig is supposed to retire at the end of the 2012 season. He has an office at the University of Wisconsin set up for himself and everything.  Yep, pushing 80, it’s time for the Budster to finally ease into retirement.  Too bad no one thinks he’s gonna.  From Bill Madden’s latest at the Daily News:

… there isn’t a single person in baseball who believes Selig, who turns 78 in July, is going anywhere any time soon … even Selig’s closest friends find laughable the notion of him walking away from a job that pays upwards of $20 million per year, along with the perks of a private jet, to teach sports history.

Madden notes some have suggested that Selig will retire so he can be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Madden quotes someone who thinks Selig is likely to get the “must be retired” rule at the Hall of Fame changed. Which, in all honesty, he could probably do with a phone call.

Madden thinks that it will soon be announced that Selig will accept a a two-year extension to remain on as Commissioner with the pretext being to see the Mets through their troubles and to help the Rays find a new ballpark and/or city.

I wouldn’t bet two bits against that. I probably wouldn’t bet a nickel.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.