Bill Mueller is getting at least one Hall of Fame vote

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I kinda liked Bill Mueller as a player. Got on base at a nice clip. Won a batting title. Was part of the 2004 Red Sox World Series team and hit well in the series itself. Maybe the numbers say differently but I want to remember him as playing a good third base. To the extent anyone ever thought to interview him, he seemed like a nice thoughtful chap.

And now, courtesy of Pedro Gomez of ESPN, he’s getting at least one Hall of Fame vote.

Gomez has taken a bunch of flak in the past day or two since that article went up.  To his credit he’s defended his vote on Twitter, calling it a “favored son vote,” and saying he gave it to Mueller to honor “what he represented.”

To his credit, but let’s not pretend that the defense has any merit. While I don’t think such token votes are a crime against nature — at least as long as no worthy candidate is being left off a ballot, which in Gomez’ case no one is — but that kind of thing bugs the living hell out of me.  We’re lectured by the voters constantly about how unpleasant a job it is filling out a Hall of Fame ballot and being told that we simply can’t understand how hard it is to make such decisions, and then someone uses their ballot as if it were for the homecoming king competition.

UPDATE:  I’m reminded that Gomez is also the guy who, three years ago, gave Jay Bell a courtesy vote. Oy.

Jack Morris and Alan Trammell make the Hall of Fame on the Modern Era ballot

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The Modern Era ballot was revealed last month. The results have been announced on Sunday night. Jack Morris and Alan Trammell will be inducted into the Hall of Fame next summer.

Morris, now 62, pitched parts of 18 seasons in the majors, 14 of which were spent with the Tigers. He played on four championship teams: the 1984 Tigers, the 1991 Twins, and the 1992-93 Blue Jays. While his regular season stats weren’t terribly impressive beyond his 254 wins, Morris has always had a decent amount of Hall of Fame support due to his postseason performances. Morris shut the Braves out over 10 innings in Game 7 of the ’91 World Series. That being said, his postseason ERA of 3.80 isn’t far off his regular season ERA of 3.90. If you ask me, Morris doesn’t pass muster for the Hall of Fame. He now has the highest career ERA of any pitcher in the Hall.

Trammel, now 59, had been unjustly kept out of the Hall of Fame despite a terrific career. He hit .285/.352/.415 across parts of 20 seasons from 1977-96, all with the Tigers. He was regarded as a tremendous defender and made a memorable combination up the middle with Lou Whitaker, who also played with the Tigers from 1977-95. According to Baseball Reference, Trammell racked up 70.4 Wins Above Replacement during his career, which is slightly more than Hall of Famer Barry Larkin (70.2) and as much as Hall of Famer Ron Santo (70.4).

Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant, and Marvin Miller were not elected to the Hall of Fame. Miller continuing to be shut out is a travesty. Craig has written at length here about Miller’s exclusion.