What do we really know about Mr. Met?

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Richard Sandomir has a nice story in the New York Times today about Mr. Met. About his history. About how beloved he is. And about how, despite all of the turmoil the Mets have found themselves in over the years, Mr. Met has always been there, smiling and spreading good will:

Mr. Met, then, can be seen as the one blameless figure in Flushing. Mr. Met doesn’t give up five runs in four innings. He doesn’t lose fly balls in the sun. He hasn’t lost his home run stroke. He didn’t throw in his finances with Bernard L. Madoff. He didn’t design Citi Field. He is, in his way, harmlessly pure. And as a result, arguably more popular than ever.

That’s one theory.  Another theory:  with a few exceptions, Mr. Met has been around for every bad thing that has ever happened to the Mets since he was introduced in 1964.

He’s the constant. You can’t blame Fred Wilpon bad stuff that happened in the 60s. You can’t blame Daryl Strawberry for the Mets recent late season collapses.  You can’t blame David Wright for the aborted dynasty of the mid-to-late 80s. You can’t blame George Foster for the financial turmoil in which the team currently finds itself.

But Mr. Met has seen it all.  He has sat back quietly — too quietly if you ask me — while others have taken the fall.

There are no accidents people. And there should be no sacred cows.  It’s high time someone got to the bottom of what, exactly, Mr. Met knew and when did he know it.

A-Rod to join ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball booth

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Alex Rodriguez’s post-retirement renaissance continues apace. After starring as a studio host for Fox’s playoff coverage over the past couple of years, A-Rod is about to be named to, arguably, televised baseball’s top job: color commentary in ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball booth.

Michael McCarthy of The Sporting News is hearing that ESPN is going to give the gig, vacated by Aaron Boone by virtue of his hiring by the Yankees, to Rodriguez. There he’ll join Jessica Mendoza and whoever they get to replace play-by-play man Dan Shulman, who chose to step back from the Sunday night job following last season. This, by the way, marks the second time A-Rod has taken over Aaron Boone’s job given that he replaced Boone at third base for the Yankees in 2004.

The twist: A-Rod is likely to keep his Fox postseason job too. While some broadcasters work for multiple networks, it’s pretty rare for Fox to allow its talents to work for competitors like that. Apparently they believe keeping A-Rod — who five years ago was one of the most despised figures in baseball — is worth it. What a difference a few years makes.

In other news, Alex Rodriguez is likely to be shunned mightily by the current crop of BBWAA voters when he hits the Hall of Fame ballot in a couple of years. At the rate he’s going, though, their successors will put him in Cooperstown via the Ford Frick Award sometime in the 2040s.