Must-click link: long-time Red Sox P.R. flack dishes the dirt

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Doug Bailey was a Boston Globe reporter. Then he was a P.R. man.  His P.R. firm repped Les Otten and Tom Werner, who went on to buy the Red Sox.  From 2001 through 2006 Bailey handled P.R. and communications for the Sox, and in his words, he “got to know these people pretty well over the years, got to see them at their best and their worst.”

And in this month’s Boston Magazine, he tells a bunch of stories about the Henry/Luchhino/Epstein/Francona Red Sox.

Some of the more interesting things: how the Sox gave out bags of infield “dirt” to fans that wasn’t dirt. The actually quite obvious secret as to how the Fenway grass looks so green. Nomar Garciaparra asking if the International Space Station is as big as Fenway Park. And, of course, some juicy inside-the-front-office stuff:

Clearly, factions were forming on Yawkey Way, roughly around one group that felt Lucchino had amassed too much power and was butting into everything, particularly baseball operations, and another that believed Epstein was more lucky than talented and owed his entire baseball existence to Lucchino. The conflict led to some tense moments and intensified the club’s already ingrained obsession with unauthorized leaks to the press.

It’s a long article so pull up a chair.  But it’s nice and juicy too, so you’ll enjoy it.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: