The Hall of Fame’s attendance is in decline

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There’s an article over at Sports Business Journal — sorry, subscription only — about the financials and attendance for the Hall of Fame.

The money part sounds somewhat more dire than it may be in practice. The joint has lost money for seven of the past nine years, including a $2.36 million loss for 2010 (the last year when full numbers were available) and a $4.3 million loss in 2009.  Obviously not great, but as the article notes, it’s misleading given that the Hall is a non-profit and a lot of its income comes from donations that, while counted in the year received, are used to fund operations for several years in some cases.

More interesting to me are the attendance numbers:

Museum attendance has slid from 352,000 in 2007 to 301,755 in 2008, 289,000 in 2009, 281,000 in 2010, and a projected figure of between 265,000 and 270,000 for 2011. Annual attendance topped 400,000 in peak years of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

A lot of the recent slide is probably due to the recession. If you can’t travel as often, the trip to way-out-of-the-way upstate New York is probably high on the list for sacrifice.

I imagine some of it, too, has to do with casual fans moving away somewhat from baseball in the mid-90s with the labor strife and the overall rise in the popularity of other sports.  Casual fans still go to the games in droves because it’s a relatively low opportunity cost kind of pursuit, but they’re not going to make a special point to go to the Hall. Sports overall have become more fragmented.

All of which makes me wonder — as others have before — what attendance would look like if the Hall were, you know, someplace near a major population center.  It’s an academic point given how deeply the Hall’s management and board are invested in the town of Cooperstown, but it would be a pretty gigantic increase if the place was in New York or Chicago, I’m sure.

Report: Twins sign Erick Aybar to minor-league deal

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The Twins have reportedly signed free agent shortstop Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal, LaVelle E. Neal III of the Star Tribune reported Friday. FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman adds that the deal comes with a potential $1.25 million if Aybar reaches the majors, with additional incentives based on plate appearances. He’ll be able to opt out on March 27. The team has yet to confirm the signing.

Aybar, 34, is now four years removed from his career year in 2014. He’s been in a state of steady decline since then, slashing just .234/.300/.348 with seven home runs and 11 stolen bases over 370 plate appearances for the Padres in 2017. His poor performance wasn’t helped by a fractured left foot, either, which cost him almost six weeks on the disabled list.

Still, the Twins see something promising in the veteran infielder, and reportedly intend to use him as another utility option this spring. Per Neal, Aybar will join fellow backup infielders Eduardo Escobar and Ehire Adrianza and may even (temporarily) take over for Miguel Sano at third base if Sano isn’t able to shape up for the role by Opening Day.