Dr. Lupica will see you now

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Mike Lupica — who I’m sure has some sort of medical degree or else he wouldn’t be allowed to go after a doctor like this due to his total lack of expertise and credibility on such issues — is skeptical about the physician who treated A-Rod’s knee over in Germany:

Nobody is saying that Wehling, the new star doctor of the moment in sports, is Galea, or will ever look at any kind of legal trouble. Maybe what Wehling is doing with blood really is better than what everybody else is doing, he is one of those guys out of science and medicine who really is a step or two ahead of the field.

But sometimes you don’t have to be either a doctor or a scientist to know that when things look too good to be true, they usually are.

He repeatedly refers to the blood-spinning procedure A-Rod got as “a quick fix” and the whole column drips with dubiousness that is only present because A-Rod is involved and he’s a big lightning rod for this stuff, not because there’s a single reason to believe that the doctor or the procedure in question is suspect legally or ethically.

I’m struck by the notion that if Lupica were writing 90 years ago he’d be putting up columns going after Alexander Felming:

“Nobody is saying that Fleming, the man who claims that if Penicillium notatum were grown in the appropriate substrate, it would exude a substance with antibiotic properties, is possessed by evil spirits and practices sorcery, but sometimes you don’t have to be a doctor or scientist to know that if things look too good to be true, they usually are.”

Not sure which 1920s ballplayer would be the whipping boy Alex Rodriguez is because of it, but I’m going with … Babe Herman of the Brooklyn Robins. His name — there has to be some sort of “little Babe” or “FauxBabe” construction the tabloids would go in for — and the city he played in would be way too ripe for a guy like Lupica to riff on all the time.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.