Dr. Lupica will see you now

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Mike Lupica — who I’m sure has some sort of medical degree or else he wouldn’t be allowed to go after a doctor like this due to his total lack of expertise and credibility on such issues — is skeptical about the physician who treated A-Rod’s knee over in Germany:

Nobody is saying that Wehling, the new star doctor of the moment in sports, is Galea, or will ever look at any kind of legal trouble. Maybe what Wehling is doing with blood really is better than what everybody else is doing, he is one of those guys out of science and medicine who really is a step or two ahead of the field.

But sometimes you don’t have to be either a doctor or a scientist to know that when things look too good to be true, they usually are.

He repeatedly refers to the blood-spinning procedure A-Rod got as “a quick fix” and the whole column drips with dubiousness that is only present because A-Rod is involved and he’s a big lightning rod for this stuff, not because there’s a single reason to believe that the doctor or the procedure in question is suspect legally or ethically.

I’m struck by the notion that if Lupica were writing 90 years ago he’d be putting up columns going after Alexander Felming:

“Nobody is saying that Fleming, the man who claims that if Penicillium notatum were grown in the appropriate substrate, it would exude a substance with antibiotic properties, is possessed by evil spirits and practices sorcery, but sometimes you don’t have to be a doctor or scientist to know that if things look too good to be true, they usually are.”

Not sure which 1920s ballplayer would be the whipping boy Alex Rodriguez is because of it, but I’m going with … Babe Herman of the Brooklyn Robins. His name — there has to be some sort of “little Babe” or “FauxBabe” construction the tabloids would go in for — and the city he played in would be way too ripe for a guy like Lupica to riff on all the time.

Albert Pujols hit his 597th career home run

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Angels DH Albert Pujols smacked his 597th career home run, a two-run shot in the top of the first inning during Wednesday night’s 5-2 loss to the Rays. The blast was off of Erasmo Ramirez and marked No. 6 on the season for the future Hall of Famer.

Pujols finished 1-for-3 with the homer and a walk. After Wednesday’s game, he’s hitting a lackluster .244/.296/.378 with 34 RBI and 14 runs scored in 186 trips to the plate.

Pujols currently ranks ninth on baseball’s all-time leaderboard and is three shy of joining the 600-homer club. He’s currently 13 home runs away from tying Sammy Sosa for eighth all-time.

Chris Sale’s streak of starts with at least 10 strikeouts ends

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Red Sox starter Chris Sale entered Wednesday’s outing against the Rangers with at least 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive starts, tying a record he already shared with Pedro Martinez. He failed do break the record, racking up only six strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. Fortunately, the Red Sox scored seven runs in the bottom of the seventh to put him in line for the win. Sale gave up four runs (three earned) on six hits and a walk.

After Wednesday’s outing, Sale is sitting on a 2.34 ERA with a 101/14 K/BB ratio in 73 innings. So far, so good for the Red Sox, who acquired Sale from the White Sox in December.

Sale previously racked up 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive games between May 23 and June 30 in 2015 with the White Sox. Pedro Martinez accomplished the feat for the Red Sox between August 19 and September 27 in 1999.